Effective Punishment In Workplace

1276 Words 6 Pages
The significant amount of factors involved when deciding whether or not punishment is effective is complicated, which can lead to some confusion. Ineffective punishment procedures can lead to high turnover, which can be costly to the company (Rue & Byers, 2009). Additionally, according to studies, establishing trust within the organization is essential to having an effective punishment policy, regardless of which policy the organization has implemented (Balliet & Van Lange, 2013). Many managers use misguided tactics of harsh punishment to discourage undesirable behavior while undermining their own credibility unbeknownst to themselves (Atwater, et al., 2007). Using that tactic can damage the trust between employees and managers, which can …show more content…
First, how will the discipline affect the employee? Will it encourage them to change their behavior in a positive way, or will it cause an already troubled employee to become disgruntled? Second, how will the discipline affect the surrounding employees? Will they think it was fair, while giving the employee an opportunity to improve, or will they think it was unfair causing additional employees to become disgruntled and unproductive? Finally, how do these punishment policies affect the managers and supervisors who are responsible for administering discipline? Will they be overseeing policies that breed a healthy work environment, or will they be building animosity in the workplace? The answers to these questions may be answered by applying the principles discussed to a hypothetical company with office environments, as well as industrial environments, which may include warehouses, and aircraft hangars, using the available data which applies these principles in real world …show more content…
However, companies operate in a dynamic environment from the highest executive offices, human resources offices, call centers, warehouses, hangars, and to industrial job sites. Consequently, a dynamic discipline strategy is likely the best method to administering discipline, since heavy handed punishments may yield negative results in an industrial environment. Likewise, Just Culture would not be very effective if using the program at a call center, accounting department, or other office environment. Having a discipline strategy well suited for each department’s environment is likely the fairest way of responding to problem areas, while maintaining a positive work environment that breeds productivity and growth, both for the organization, as well as the individuals. Additionally, implementing an awards program may also be a way to circumvent the need to discipline by offering an incentive to set reachable goals, which will keep productivity up, and keep absenteeism, employee deviance, and inefficiency to a minimum. Furthermore, implementing a non-punitive strategy, such as Just Culture, to the safety oriented work centers will encourage the safest work environment while saving discipline for reckless individuals. Finally, since many of these programs may go hand in hand, finding

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