The Importance Of Income Inequality In Healthcare

700 Words 3 Pages
Income inequality for millions has created a public health crisis to include drug abuse, violence, suicide, mental illness, and chronic disease within the disadvantaged communities in the United States. To further disparity, some states did not expand the Medicare and Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act; thus, vulnerable populations such as the working poor, children, elderly, and disabled are unable to acquire health care coverage. Without health care coverage, treatable and preventable disease continues to cause economic stress to our health care system (Pfiefer, 2016). Distributive justice is, believed by many, necessary to provide the impoverished and disadvantaged the right to health and wellness for all people (Lancaster, …show more content…
The equalitarian theory even further describes distributive justice in health care for the good of all. In contrast, the Libertarian ethical theory classifies healthcare as goods and services that should be paid for by the consumer; and the luck equalitarian view believes you are responsible for the cost of your health care due to your lifestyle choices unless your health risks are not your fault (Ekmekci and Arda, 2015). Additionally, the medical need theory believes health care is distributed according to medical determinants and only what is necessary, not socioeconomical status. For example, pregnancy is not considered a disease; therefore, birth control pills would not be covered. The belief is that everyone’s basic need should be met according to a scientific medical condition and not driven by moral judgements (Horne, 2016). According to Bauzon (2015), to guarantees healthcare equality would mean that purchasing additional health insurance is not allowed by the government. This makes distributive justice unrealistic because there are not enough good health resources to equally distribute to the population. Altruistic views in health care differ and populations struggle to agree on the economic delivery; however, success depends on health …show more content…
12). Primary prevention is the promotion of healthy living and disease prevention to populations at risk through education, public policy, and immunization (Adams and Messias, 2016). An example of primary prevention to protect at risk populations is for a nurse to advocate for policy changes in public schools to provide all students with a free healthy lunch. Secondary prevention is the early identification and treatment of an acute illness or disease mostly resulting in recovery or complications (Institute for Work and Health, 2015). State provided care for pregnant women results in early prenatal prevents infant mortality from complications from, for example, gestational diabetes and high blood pressure. Lastly, tertiary care, decreases the impact of chronic disease and illness to improve quality of life and improve their ability to function (Adams and Messias, 2016). . Primary and specialty care provides affordable care and prescriptions to manage their disease such as cardiac disease and diabetes Poor health outcomes upstream can be eliminated or minimized when nurses are involved in the three preventive interventions (Institute for Work and Health,

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