The Importance Of Human Trafficking In Law Enforcement

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The prevalence of human trafficking in the United States is an issue law enforcement and policy makers are attempting to address. Unfortunately, this crime is growing in number of incidents despite these efforts. This analysis examined the victims of human trafficking, showing how there are a broad range of victims in human trafficking. This addresses the misconception that only persons outside of the U.S. are victims of human trafficking. Also discussed is the need for better training amongst local law enforcement officers, due to the role they have confronting cases of human trafficking. Training for these officers would include education about human trafficking, and how to identify human trafficking. There also needs to be specific policies …show more content…
It is estimated that 700,000 people are trafficked every year while roughly 50,000 people are trafficked within the United States (Walker-Rodriguez, 2010). It has also been estimated that almost 2.5 million people are currently enslaved in a form of trafficking (Dunne, 2012). This paper will discuss the victims of trafficking, the need for better human trafficking training for law enforcement, and how anti-human trafficking policies need to a more victim-centered approach.
METHODOLOGY
Most of the sources cited in this research report were gathered through the online search of the University of Baltimore’s Langsdale Library. The Langsdale Library’s Criminal Justice database search was specifically used, due to the focus of the criminal justice response to human trafficking in this paper. An additional source used to gather information was the Bureau of Justice Statistics website. This was used to examine specific statistical information about human trafficking cases reported to government agencies.
DATA ANALYSIS AND
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It is important to discuss this because if a victim does not report the crime committed against them, it may prohibit the help law enforcement officers can give. If victims who escape from their traffickers do not report their victimization, it may inhibit the help law enforcement can offer. Some of the reasons that victims may not report their trafficker is fear of being deported or prosecuted if their victimization is interpreted as a crime, as previously mentioned (Nichols & Heil,

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