Argumentative Essay: Restoring Human Rights

Great Essays
Analco
English 100
Professor Kaufman
1 December 2016
Restoring Human Rights “Human rights are not a privilege granted by the few, they are a liberty entitled to all, and human rights, by definition, include the rights of all humans, those in the dawn of life, the dusk of life or the shadows of life”, stated Kay Granger. The United States has a document called Universal Declaration of Human Rights which represents different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world. The declaration consists of thirty articles which includes the right to life and liberty freedom from slavery and torture, freedom of opinion and expression, the right to work and get an education. Every individual is entitled to the same right without discrimination
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In Eric Posner New York Times article, he argues that human rights law is too ambiguous. He claims that, it overwhelms states with obligations they can’t possibly keep also that it provides no method for evaluating whether government act reasonably or not (2014). In my opinion we need more treaties to support human rights. The United States needs more treaties to prevent torture against suspected terrorists, police brutality, and to prevent criminals who often receive harsh punishments. Nations need stricter obligations and more powerful international institutions to strengthen human rights law. Human rights treaties help to explain why the abuse of power is wrong. Posner implies, that we should move on and focus on relying heavily on foreign aid for economic development. Posner see treaties as “utopian “statements of ambitious goals that cannot possibly be met. In response to Posner’s, treaties are effective even when courts are too weak to enforce them because they codify a public view about how its government should behave. Human rights are more than laws they are a reflection of higher aspirations as human beings. Human rights treaties are important because they protect everyone and shine a light on a positive path …show more content…
In order to stop this type of violence, states must institute policies aimed at human rights protection. To protect human rights is to ensure that people receive some decent humane treatment. Also introducing political systems that protect human rights are thought to reduce the threat of world conflict. International human rights law protects the right to life and physical integrity and attempt to limit the unrestrained power of the state. These laws are to protect humanity against anything that challenges people’s health, economic, and political peace. However, in many cases government officials polices violate basic human rights. Such abuse of power by political leaders or state authorities have devastating effects, including crimes against humanity. Michelle Maiese states, in order to truly address human rights violations, people must strive to understand the underlying causes of these breaches. According to Maiese, these causes have to do with underdevelopment, economic pressure, social problems and international conditions. It is true, the roots of repression, discrimination and other denials of human rights stem from deeper and more complex problems. It is only by understanding these root causes and strengthening both democracy and civil society that we can truly protect human

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