Rhetorical Techniques In Shakespeare

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In Shakespeare tragedies we can learn a lot about ourselves as Human beings. By examining the darkest depths of human nature we can learn what leads people to sometimes take such dire drastic measures and hopefully not go there ourselves. Shakespeare who has written hundreds of books and scripts had a talent for conveying human emotions in words. Although his writings were not in proper modern English, these emotions were still easy to comprehend. Many times Shakespeare ignored the common rules of English writing but this technique, instead of distorting the meaning of his words, was actually strengthening our image of these intense emotions. His vast and immense vocabulary brought new meaning to our language and contributed greatly to our …show more content…
His language seemed foreign and inverse, which usually intimidates the common reader. He uses many rhetorical devices to construct the very arguments that he may be trying to persuade. This technique is called antithesis, which is an opposition between two things. The most famous antithesis Shakespeare uses is “To be, or not to be” (18). This clarifies the question he is asking himself. Now, sometimes these rhetorical devices are used in a soliloquy. This means that the feelings that are being portrayed are just one’s thoughts being revealed aloud to the reader and no one else. Shakespeare became very well known for this technique which he implemented in most if not all his playwrights. This became a very powerful tool to inform the reader of any character intentions as well. In the story of King Lear we read “Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave my heart into my mouth” (Shakespeare 14) . Here he speaks to himself aloud but means for no one to hear him. Some readings may appear to be backwards or inverse. He uses metaphors constantly in these inverse lines. These metaphors help the reader clarify just exactly what imagery Shakespeare delivers. What many authors fail to do is display these imagery sequences before the character establishes his position towards and event. Sometimes Shakespeare would get a bit carried away and implement up 4 or 5 imagery sequences in one emotion. In my opinion this magnifies the emotional stress that is being

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