The Importance Of Human Nature In Macbeth

Good Essays
Rise above. There is such an salient meaning in two ordinary words when they are combined. Everyday brings about new challenges and it is often desirable to give into temptation; nevertheless, we understand the vitality of staying grounded. So why is it human nature to feel compelled into temptation when we know it’s wrong? Shakespeare's renowned play Macbeth, demonstrates illusion vs reality alongside the essence of human nature. In the play, Macbeth himself bears the responsibility for the Death of Duncan, his king, his kinsman, and his guest. This is shown when Macbeth allowed his gullibility to get ahead of him as he acted upon the witches’ prophecies, when he gave into Lady Macbeth’s taunting instead of standing his ground, and in his reaction to Lady Macbeth’s death. Macbeth lacked the capability to rise above these predicaments and instead decided to succumb to temptation, leading to the ruin of himself alongside others. While it is commonly argued that Lady Macbeth or the three witches are at fault in the play, it all falls back to Macbeth: he who allowed himself to be manipulated instead of remaining adherent to his true values.

When Shakespeare's Macbeth begins, Macbeth is the Thane of Glamis. Shakespeare characterizes Macbeth as a man of integrity who is loyal to Duncan. The first
…show more content…
Is it real? Many people refer to guilt as a feeling we have as a result of something bad we have done; however, it is often argued that guilt is simply an illusion. This brings us back to the theme of illusion vs reality that Shakespeare presents in his characters. Lady Macbeth allowed guilt to takeover her to the point where she committed suicide. When Macbeth was told that his wife killed herself out of guilt for all of the horrid things they had committed, he acknowledged that life was nothing but an illusion. Instead of facing reality and putting a stop to all the horrible deeds he had performed, he continued even without Lady Macbeth’s manipulative

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The Tragic Hero In Macbeth

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The realization of one’s own downfall, or as Aristotle once said “A man cannot become a hero until he can see the root of his own downfall." Macbeth felt guilty soon after the murder, confirming that his conscience was still in tact. Confessing to his wife: “I am afraid to think what I have done” (2.2.64), and describing his bloody hands as “a sorry sight.” (2.2.20). Despite his active conscience, Macbeth continued to kill without remorse in order to retain his throne. Following the death of Lady Macbeth, who had gone mad due to guilt, Macbeth states that “life’s but a walking shadow… a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” (5.5.24-28).…

    • 1025 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Hamlet made it very clear during the play in letting Claudius know that he knew about the murder of his father. This made Claudius both angry and scared. We know this when he calls out, “Give me some light, away!” (Act 3, Scene 2, 270). These emotions later lead to his decision to poison Hamlet’s drink, which leads to the accidental death of Gertrude. Hamlet was also the reason his lover Ophelia went mad and killed herself.…

    • 1247 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    An example of this happens before Macbeth kills Duncan, where Macbeth questions whether or not he should murder Duncan, Lady Macbeth, with her masculine attributes, forces Macbeth to do it by saying his hope was drunk, and that he was afraid to “be the same in thine own act and valor … And live a coward in thine own esteem” (I.vii.39-51). The actions taken by Lady Macbeth show how masculinity can be a negative influence, by forcing Macbeth to do something that he probably doesn’t want to, that causes a spiral into their eventual downfall. In the middle of the play Macbeth hires murderers to kill Banquo, not the most masculine way to go about killing someone, but, this shows that Macbeth is trying to be masculine and by killing Banquo. His strive for masculinity shows that he is stuck in this downward spiral caused by masculinity, which underlines Shakespeare’s objection to masculinity. Because Lady Macbeth persisting to her idea of manhood, and use of it to spur Macbeth into proving his manhood, both characters collapse at the end of the book.…

    • 952 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    When Lady Macbeth decides to commit suicide due to her severe psychological disorder and incurable insanity, Macbeth mourns her and his meaningless life: "She should have died hereafter …signifying nothing" [5.5.16-27]. Macbeth has become a nihilist who cannot see the worth and value of life. He experiences life rapidly, from being happily married and honored by his noble king to a lonely tormented man who has…

    • 1746 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Macbeth 's wife, Lady Macbeth, is not affected by her husband 's trepidation, and urges him to follow through with the sinful act. Roles then shift, as Lady Macbeth begins to feel culpability and commits suicide. Macbeth, corrupted with his long for the throne and his power hungry attitude, acts merely on his guilt and panic-stricken behavior to project the throne, bypassing his moral conscious. But, later the guilt he feels for the blood he has shed and his fractured conscious ultimately leads Macbeth to his death. Throughout Macbeth, Shakespeare describes many scenes in which violence plays a huge role.…

    • 1398 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Hedonism In Othello

    • 1409 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In the very end, Othello tragically dies alongside his wife. He tragically fell from being the prestigious Moor to a murderous lunatic who believed in falsifications of his own wife. His focus in negativities, such as heavily viewing the possibility of his wife being unfaithful towards him instead of earnestly focusing on the positive possibility that Desdemona, his wife, is actually remaining faithful towards him, and the abundant hedonism in the play, such as his drastic desire for vengeance and knowledge and the desire of Iago, led to Othello’s downfall. Ergo, Othello is the tragic hero in William Shakespeare’s play, Othello, the Moor of Venice. Since Othello focused on the negative possibility, instead of being open to a positive possibility, and since hedonism was evident in himself and Iago, Othello, a tragic hero in the Aristotelian tragedy, obviously fell from being a man whom the senators revered to a man who was wifeless and powerless and who committed suicide.…

    • 1409 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Duncan’s blood is on her hands as well, and she falls into a fit of hysteria. The blood symbolizes her guilt she denied for so long. She is unable to see past her guilt and as a result it suffocates her mind. Lady Macbeth is found dead after falling from a great height; it is assumed that she committed suicide. When Macbeth learns of her death, he immediately responds with the words “She should of died hereafter.…

    • 1379 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He reflects on her suicide by saying, “She had no right to kill herself. It was selfish of her" (Wilde 84). Not only does Dorian disregard the fact that Sibyl killed herself as a result of Dorian’s actions, but Dorian only thinks of himself when he comes to terms with Sibyl’s death. He calls the act “selfish of her,” not acknowledging the pain Sibyl was going through because of him, but the pain she is causing him. Dorian’s selfishness also leads to another man’s death when Dorian is cleaning up the murder of Basil.…

    • 1217 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This oxymoron resembles the words of the witches in the first scene, "fair is foul, and foul is fair," which means bad is good and good is bad. After murdering King Duncan, Macbeth moves on to murder Duncan’s servants, Banquo, and Macduff’s whole family. He tells himself to hide his true self under a false appearance, he says “stars, hide your fires; let not light see my black and deep desires. The eye wink at the hand; yet let that be which the eye fears, when it is done, to see” (1.4.55-60). Mixed with constant instructions from his wife to hide his real nature, behind a fake appearance, Macbeth continues to run from his true identity.…

    • 1365 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    At its simplest level, life is merely a sequence of decisions made by an individual. When combined with outside influences such as ambition or the opinions of others, the concept of morality within these decisions is often clouded. The play Macbeth by William Shakespeare follows this same basic formula; when faced with difficult decision, the play’s titular character, Macbeth, has his morality and judgment corrupted by externalities. Although its age and diction may suggest an unnecessary level of complexity, this play is merely a reflection of the basic human experience. Shakespeare is able to express the interconnectivity of one 's actions, their being, and despite outside biases of his era, present this theme in an enduring manner.…

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays