The Importance Of Honor In Macbeth

1354 Words 6 Pages
A person may be pushed to become an honourable character through various conditions of fear. It is a priceless state of mind that to facilitate one to respect others as well as themselves and takes great willpower, which not everyone is capable of. However this idea is not something that is achieved easily, honor can be easily lost, fear being a contributing factor towards this. For people to believe a person worthy of honor they must go through situations that test their ability to cope with complicated incidents, this makes it hard to support, as one wrong move and it will all disappear. Once a person is honoured it does not mean this will carry on for their entire existence. Their own actions can decide whether they deserve what status they …show more content…
Although, for Macbeth to sustain this honor he must continue on the right path and reflect it with his actions throughout his future plans. During this time his cousin Duncan also describes him as worthy and brave, and rewards Macbeth with the title of the Thane of Cawdor and exclaims his great trust for Macbeth at the end of this scene: “What he hath lost, noble Macbeth hath won.” (Shakespeare, I, ii, 77) Not soon after he is faced with tests following what he is told by the witches in which “[w]e are confronted by mystery, darkness, abnormality, hideousness: and therefore by fear” (Knight 146). Ultimately the witches and the three prophecies’ are where the fear is …show more content…
He went from being honoured and trusted by people to being feared and wanted lifeless, it is almost as though he is “…imprisoned in the world he has made”(Knights 102). He felt as though he was undefeatable, as no one born of a woman could kill him. Yet he asks for his armor in the following quote: “’I’ll fight, till from my bones my flesh be hack’d. / Give me my armor.” (Shakespeare, V, iii, 36-37) Seyton, Macbeth’s armor bearer, responds with: “ 'Tis not needed yet.” (Shakespeare, V, iii, 38) However Macbeth still insists he has his armor put on. The fear is clearly brought out here for the reason that if an armor bearer says that the armor is not needed, they know what they are talking about and Macbeth needs the protection just to relieve his sudden panic. In an attempt to distract himself, and conceal his fear further he claims “[he] will not be afraid of death and bane, / Til Birnam forest come to Dunsinane.” (Shakespeare, V, iii, 68-69) While if he were not afraid there would have been no need to put his armor on, thus bringing his fear made even more known than it previously had been. In all the confusion his wife commits suicide. Macbeth realizes that he has changed drastically in the following

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