The Importance Of Harry Potter

1403 Words 6 Pages
In an era of video games, cable television, magazines, and the Internet adding to the exposure of children to sex, violence, and profanity at a young age, there is a heated debate in children’s literature as to what material is educational, but not immoral for children’s young minds. Many of these debates are motivated by Christianity and the Bible; however, Christians are also in support of the same controversial literature. Although it is important to censor certain material from children, it is entirely one 's opinion whether or not this cultural fight has any impact on a children 's long-term development. The heated debate of censorship stems from a desire to protect a children 's innocence, yet children will continue to be exposed to outside …show more content…
So how can the same book have such contrasting viewpoints on its intended purpose? The answer to this question boils down to once again to perception. Many claim that Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (all the Harry Potter books in fact), “have been influential in promoting children’s literature and in fostering children’s love for reading. Children are able to identify with Potter, perhaps because he does not look like a typical hero—he is average looking and wears glasses” (Binnendyk and Schonert-Reichl 194). In a similar manner, Harry’s history of being tormented in school allows many children to have empathy and learn from the way Harry handles difficulties. Furthermore, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, along with the various other Harry Potter books, are an expression of morality that teaches children a clear sense of good vs. evil(right vs. wrong). Although there are evil characters found in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, J.K. Rowling clearly shows that Harry’s “role is to restore peace in the school by battling against the dark, evil magic. Harry has no difficulty understanding what is right for the school with the help of his two best friends and the memory of his parents,” (Binnendyk and Schonert-Reichl 197) teaching children the positive message of what is right. In addition, in …show more content…
J.K. Rowling, in her first novel, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, “conveys the moral theme [of teamwork] in her story. [In various times in the book,] students must learn to work together and develop a conscious awareness of their actions and their effect on the peers in their community” (Binnendyk and Schonert-Reichl 198). Although there are many negative aspects of the Harry Potter stories, parents and educators can use Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, as a “vehicle to promote moral development in pre-adolescent children because many of the characters in the story exhibit stages of moral reasoning to which this age group can relate [to]” (Binnendyk and Schonert-Reichl 200). Overall, children are able to relate to Harry most likely as the result of being in the stage of identity verses role confusion in their psychosocial development, in which children begin to discover their true identity. Because of this, many children ages eleven and beyond (Harry Potter is recommend for age 12 and beyond), “seek out books that show young people struggling with who they are, what is important, and how to deal with an increasingly complicated world—a world in a constant state of change” (Russell 25), which is why Rowling’s story appeals to a vast age group who are seeking a story that has moral

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