Regulation Technology Barriers

708 Words 3 Pages
Regulation barriers prevent institutions from professionally developing technology and processes that are critical for green supply chains. Law regulating Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) commonly make it complicated to share information among the industries. This is because laws control information and technology, making the reach of technology dependent on the groups that are in control of the information. This causes a stoppage in the modifying the process by creating a problem for the transfer of environmentally sound technology that was briefly discussed in (Steiner, 2010). These barriers are great for Committee of African Heads of State and Government on Climate Change that has taken a position of calling as cited in (Keating, 2009) …show more content…
On the other hand, several local industries and enterprises lack access to green technology, and still rely on conventional technology, which is particularly evident in the on the rise countries. Institutional, regulatory, and financial barriers further worsen technological barriers by avoiding the construction of new technology. If these barriers are not taken care of and green technology is not created, there will be another set of complications in the future to address climate change, loss of biodiversity, and environmental …show more content…
This maybe for a range of reasons: the price of going green is too high in the developing countries and their industries may not have the budgetary resources to go green. The cost of greening supply chains may defer from wanting to make such a transition the author said in (Leichenko et al., 2010; UNEP, 2011; van Loon-Steensma et al., 2014). After the 2008 global financial crisis, a lot of firms and governments no longer have the money to invest in green technology or are cautious to spend such a large amount. Australia was depressed from rebuilding its water supply due to extremely high fees that had to be paid in response to the global financial crisis. Within some underprivileged countries, the upfront cost served as a more the normal barrier for the fewer resources with which they could actually invest in green technology. As a result that was stated in (Leichenko et al., 2010; UNEP, 2011; van Loon-Steensma et al., 2014) these countries remain to be burdened with older infrastructures and technologies. Furthermore, the reimbursement period for implementing green supply chains may also be too great for businesses. Although the reimbursement period for greening buildings is generally between five to ten years, this time period may be too long because of people 's natural propensity for risk

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