The Importance Of Greek Culture In Oedipus Rex

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Throughout the course of human history, reverence to one or many gods has affected the ways of life and literature. Higher powers controlling one’s life are commonly written about, referenced, and even evaded. It can be seen throughout the text Oedipus Rex, that Greek culture greatly influences Sophocles in displaying the thematic message that fate is ultimately unavoidable. Within the text of Oedipus Rex it can distinctly be seen that the Greek time period and lifestyle inspired and affected Sophocles in his writing. During Sophocles’ era, Greek life, social status, and politics relied heavily on the male population. Thus the text displays that Oedipus, the lead role, is a male, and holds all the power within the family. Oedipus and his …show more content…
All great heroes, must possess a fatal flaw, to make less than the gods. Oedipus’ flaw was hubris, and he held himself in a position too high above the gods. He referred to himself quite highly, saying things like “I, Oedipus, who bear the famous name.” (4). His pride and arrogance ultimately led to his demise, making him a tragic hero. The balancing of the golden scale, in Oedipus Rex, illustrates the effect that the surrounding Greek culture had on Sophocles and his …show more content…
King Laios is one of the first character’s to try to escape his fate, that was revealed to him by an oracle. He was told “his doom would be death as the hands of his own son” (38), henceforth he set out to change it. His way of circumventing this horrific destiny was by abandoning his son, with his ankles bound, in the mountains to die. However, fate still had it’s way and “Laios was killed at a place where three roads meet.” (39), by his own son. Laios’ attempt to avoid his fatal fate proved faulty, and the things destined to happen were still brought about by the gods. This can lead one to assume that fate will accomplish it’s goals, so matter what obstacles present

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