The Importance Of Government In Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart

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In Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, government is used by the British to control the Ibo in times of conflict between the two groups. The British and Ibo are both affected by government and try to use it when the other culture does something offensive to them, as they would not punish themselves for the wrongdoings to an outsider. Achebe uses the government to effectively show how two cultures clash when put together, and without talking and trying to understand each other like what Mr. Brown tried to accomplish, they will head towards one culture being marginalized and subjugated like what happened when Mr.Smith replaced Mr.Brown. In the book it says, “Whenever Mr. Brown went to that village he spent long hours with Akunna in his obi talking through an interpreter about religion. Neither of them succeeded in converting the other but they learned more about their different beliefs,”(154) showing how Mr. Brown and Akunna tried to mutually understand each other’s culture through these debates in order to minimize conflict and to do what is just and moral in a situation, without completely disregarding the other’s culture and thoughts. In our Utopia, we therefore tried to create a situation where there was a better possibility in everyone having …show more content…
Our utopia strove to mend these tears and make it fair to both of the cultures. We also wanted to make it so the Ibo and British learn about each other’s culture and cooperate in situations so that the most just decision is reached. There would certainly be conflict and debate on which laws and punishments were passed, as the cultures are both just too different. We expect cultural conflict and instead of using that to kill each other, our utopia tried to make it so that the conflicts fueled the government, making laws that pertain to both cultures, and that they can both have their rights

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