The Importance Of Geography In The Battle Of Salamis

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History is shaped by actions taken based on how advantages can be used in the environment, how it could disable the enemy’s advantages, and how poorly or advantageously geography is used to aid the likelihood of winning a battle; as well as exploits made by how personally suited the strategy is to enforce army advantages or to restrict the disadvantages in order to equalize or empower the troops against the enemy. Using the various strategies of limiting troops, prolonging the duration of the battle, avoiding the enemy, and utilizing outside forces along with geography to limit troops and protect a city affect tactical decisions made by military leaders and influence the outcome of the battle or even war based on how effectively they respond. …show more content…
Themistocles thought it would be wise to fight the Persian fleet in a limited amount of space considering that the Greek ships were far smaller and less protected compared to the Persians, so he convinced Xerxes that attacking near the island of Salamis would lead to his ensured victory by sending him a letter stating that the Greeks were discouraged and ready to surrender. Xerxes believed that sending his fleet to the straits east of Salamis and off the coast of Athens would easily enable his troops to overtake the Greek fleet and complete the Persian conquest of Greece. Themistocles also sent a letter to Xerxes informing him that a small fleet of Greek ships was trying to escape from the other side of Salamis in order to get Xerxes to prevent the escape of the Greeks and to divide the number of troops he would have to combat. This convinced Xerxes to tactically split his troops up in order to prevent the escape of the Greeks lessening Xerxes’ forces and aiding Greek advantages. Since the Persian fleet was bulkier and heavier (most likely due to the fact that over twenty heavily armed hoplites were on board), the seasmen had difficulty performing the …show more content…
Tactically, Hannibal had to send for help to Carthage so that the Carthaginian base would not be overtaken. Since Agrigentum was very easily defensible, the land was desirable to own during the war causing Carthage to send Hanno to aid the starving citizens in Agrigentum. Similarly, Athens sent for help to Sparta after Eretria was attacked and waited near the shrine of Hercules on a mountain in Marathon for the relief force to arrive. Both of these battles exemplify how the strategy of waiting defensively and forcing the enemy to attack or to attack them off-guard was used effectively in order to wait until advantages arrive or until the enemy comes across

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