The Importance Of Friendship In Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner

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“The Japanese have a term, kenzoku, which translated literally means ‘family. '" The term is often suggested as a mutual and agreeable relationship between two individuals who have similar commitments and who possibly share a similar destiny.” In Khaled Hosseini’s novel, The Kite Runner, Amir and Hassan share a complex friendship unlike any other. Fed from the same woman 's breast they have grown up as inseparable playmates despite any differences. However, their friendship is one-sided and tragic. Amir has never really been able to call Hassan his friend, due to their different social classes and the lies that lie between them. Hassan does, however attempts to satisfy Amir in all. Hassan does this to bring joy to their friendship, and even …show more content…
In the novel, The Kite Runner, Amir is afraid to be Hassan’s true friendship primarily due to the great challenge of the social classes which separates them. Khaled Hosseini conveys this idea directly when he writes, “But in none of his stories did Baba ever refer to Ali as his friend.The curious thing was, I never thought of Hassan and me as friends either... Because history isn’t easy to overcome. Neither is religion. In the end, I was a Pashtun and he was a Hazara, I was a Sunni and he was a Shi’a, and nothing was ever going to change that. Nothing (Hosseini pg 22)." Hassan is a Hazara and Amir is a Pashtun while Amir enjoys a life of wealth Hassan is far under the social status. Amir is fearful of the judgement and outcast that will be brought by to him by his own community. The peer pressure of being accepted by society and being superior like Baba, end up driving Amir out of a great friendship with …show more content…
Hosseini projects this belief when he writes,“ 'Would I ever lie to you, Amir agha? '... 'I don 't know. Would you? ' 'I 'd sooner eat dirt, ' he said with a look of indignation... 'Really? You 'd do that? ' 'Eat dirt if I told you to, ' I said. I knew I was being cruel...‘If you asked, I would,’ he finally said.” (Hosseini pg 47-48) Amir’s insecurity within him and with his father causes him to test the faithfulness of Hassan.Unlike him Hassan is sincere, a trait that Amir does not on. For that reason Amir finds it hard to trust Hassan’s loyalty and is constantly testing, yet Hassan’s true values make him a greater person. Furthermore, in the novel Amir can not comprehend how someone can be as loyal as Hassan, and especially a Hazara.In the novel Hosseini carrys out this idea when he writes, “I hurled the pomegranate at him. It struck him in the chest... Hassan’s cry was pregnant with surprise and pain...“Get up! Hit me!”...
Then Hassan did pick up a pomegranate. He walked toward me. He opened it and crushed it against his own forehead. “There,” he croaked, red dripping down his face like blood. “Are you satisfied? Do you feel better?” He turned around and started down the hill.” Amir has betrayed Hassan and he knows it and getting Hassan to be disloyal to him would make him feel as low as he feel. In other words, Amir does not want to feel morally lower

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