The Theme Of Free Will In Paradise Lost By John Milton

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Is free will beneficial for humans to possess? In relation to Paradise Lost and the actions of Adam and Eve, free will did not benefit our ancestors; their independence did just the opposite. Through their freedom, Adam and Eve ate from the Forbidden Tree, disobeying their creator, God. The consumption of the fruit could have only been done through free will, since it allows an individual to act at their own discretion. This came with several consequences, like being banished from the Garden of Eden. In Paradise Lost, Milton did not justify God’s ways to man through the gift of free will, but instead incriminates God because free will is the cause of man’s downfall. God knew the outcome of His actions in this situation, but He still trusted …show more content…
Eve speaks to Adam saying, “Let us divide our labors, thou where choice leads thee or where most needs.” (9.214-5) Eve comes up with the idea of division of labor while completing her daily tasks. The division would be between the more crucial tasks or the ones each person enjoys doing best. She believes by doing this, both her and Adam would finish earlier. She acts on her idea and after some arguing with Adam, leaves him and travels to another part of Paradise. Eve is only capable of deciding to part from Adam through free will, one of the first instances we see man using free will. Unfortunately, it would have dire consequences to follow. When Eve decides to leave Adam, she loses her only line of defense and now has to rely on herself. God said Adam would protect Eve from any danger, specifically regarding Satan and his agenda to ruin humanity. Without a protector and only herself to fend for, Eve is vulnerable to temptation. From reading Paradise Lost, we know Satan would emerge victorious. This decision was the eventual catalyst for the fall of …show more content…
God gave His creations free will, but He should have been more specific on the kind of free will. Instead of being generous, God should have given free will that made sure the actions His subjects chose to do would not disobey their Creator. If this were the case, all these events leading to the fall could have been avoided. Sin and Death would have never made their debut in our world. Adam and Eve would have flourished in Eden and so would we. Instead of living in this world of sin and suffering, we would be surrounded by God’s masterpiece of Paradise. We would never fear about the day we would draw our last breath. God would protect His creations and Satan would never dare to interfere with our paradise. Currently, we interact with God through prayer which is a one way conversation, but in Paradise we would have direct interaction with him and live in his presence. God knew this would be our future if Adam and Eve had used their freedom if their loyalty to God was stronger. In his attempt to justify God’s decisions, Milton did just the opposite. Just through free will, Milton instead incriminates God’s

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