Vietnamese Diet Chart

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The chart has shown us that a typical one-day-menu of Vietnamese are closely meeting that standard of USDA. Overall, Vietnamese consumed a little bit more grains and protein than needed. The total calories came to 2131, which is 131 calories above the average daily calories recommend. But in order to fully understand this chart, we need to keep in mind that this plan does not tell the overall picture of every Vietnamese person. The diet varies from gender, economic status, jobs, geographical location… this plan rather represents the diet of a typical middle class Vietnamese age 20-35. According to a scholarly article “Food consumption patterns in the economic transition in Vietnam”, Malnutrition is still prominent in Vietnam; in 2000, 33% of …show more content…
Vietnam is the easternmost country of Southeast Asia with China facing North and Laos and Cambodia neighbors in the West. Because Vietnam located along the costal areas, which is ideal for growing rice, Rice has become the main staple food of Vietnamese throughout the history, especially in the South where the Red River delta in the north and Mekong River delta located (Food In Every Country). Steamed White Rice is common in every meal, but other form of rice such as rice cake, rice paper (spring rolls), rice noodle, rice vermicelli also represents traditional Vietnamese cuisine. Thanks to this coastal advantages, seafood, especially fish, are commonly found in everyday dishes. Fish can also be found in dipping sauces such as fish sauce or shrimp pastes. Under the tropical weather, Vietnam is able to grow variety of fruits and vegetables. Therefore, fruit and vegetables are typically served together with rice. Vegetables are usually stir-fried or steamed. Common fruit eaten are mango, jackfruit, durian, long an, papaya, …show more content…
Traditionally, it was “pot au feu” or French beef stew. The Vietnamese recreated the dish by adding white rice noodles, steak, flank, tendons, and meatballs. The word “feu” in “pot au feu” is later pronouced into “Pho” today. After the Vietnam War, Pho is further introduced to the world by refugees fleeing from Vietnam (The History and Evolution of Pho). The recipes for pho have been modified slightly according to the region it arrived to. But the core of Pho: the unique broth and white noodle stay the same. Pho also represent that division between preferences between North and South Vietnam after the war. Because The South has more food resources than North Vietnam, Pho from North Vietnam emphasize only on the simple and subtle flavor of the broth while Pho in South Vietnam tends to have more layers of herbs and spices. According to the article “ How does Pho measure up when it come to nutrition”, a typical bowl of pho

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