Chinese Food History

1824 Words 8 Pages
Throughout history, a variety of foods have allowed the modern world to gain a historical understanding on the big history and world history of our modern world. The Sichuan cuisine originating from China is a great example showing the impact of food culture and identity in our current society. The Sichuan pepper, is called huajiao in Chinese, meaning flower pepper, and the Sichuan cuisine is undisputedly the most popular cuisine known to China to this current date. Through evaluating the big history of Asia as a whole, we are able to appreciate that it is known for its rich culture and exotic foods, including the Sichuan cuisine. However, this would not exist if it did not have the big history that it has gone through. Hongjie Wang’s, “Hot …show more content…
Wang argues that the fame and participation of spicy food and Sichuan people has empowered for them to shape their revolutionary spirit as proven in both the Nationalist and Communist Revolutions. Agreeing with this statement, it is important to note that Communism and Nationalism both played a large role on the cultural, political and economic history of modern Asia. It is evident in Wang’s article that Sichuan peppers had a great impact on Communism, which is the system of government or social organisations that hold property collectively, allowing for all authorities to take complete control over the allocation of property and resources. Contrastingly, Nationalism is where the natural rights of a citizen (or nation) are accounted for and are what constitutes a sovereign state, which the Sichuanese cuisine has also played a crucial part in, as spicy peppers were labelled as the ‘meat of poor guys’. Eventually this concept changed as both the rich and poor consumed Sichuan peppers, as Mao once proudly commented during the 1949 Communist Revolution, “A man who dares to eat hot peppers fears nothing”. The leader and principal theoretician of the Chinese communist movement, Mao Zedong, is well known for his eager liking for hot peppers and this is illustrated through his famous words “If there are no spicy (peppers), there is no revolution”. This testimonial has inspired many …show more content…
Honjie Wang’s “Hot Peppers, Sichuan Cuisine and the Revolutions in Modern China” is supported by this notion on the Sichuan Cuisine and its contribution to the big history and world history of modern Asia. The Sichuan cuisine allows us to link and establish certain concepts in a variety of scholarly techniques, allowing us to construct a larger history fusing all disciplines from our past. There is a correlation between the spicy taste and groundbreaking charismata that lack a scientific foundation and may be better taken as a fancy idealisation towards the food identity of the Chinese culture. We are able to appreciate the concept of Big History through the contribution of spicy food and how it has shaped the hot temper of the Sichuanese. This has further enhanced and improved the confidence and radical spirit of Sichuan people and this is proven through their involvement in the Nationalist and Communist Revolutions during the chaotic twentieth century. The hot pepper’s spicy taste and represented cultural traits have advanced from the socio-political interface between food and the romantic remembrance of Chinese Revolutions, and this is what makes it so substantial in the past, present and future of Asian

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