A Womanly Love Analysis

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He believes fidelity should be upheld, most importantly by women. Discussing the play gives an insight into the mind of Jules and the importance he attaches to a woman’s virginity which according to him depicts her dignity. Jim was not really a fan of the movie, he found the play pretty annoying and he did not agree with the usage of vice to justify virtue. Catherine obviously takes offence to these remarks, and because she sees the connection between her life and the female protagonist. She believes a woman’s value should not be judged based on her sexual partners or the way she chooses to express herself sexually. Jim probably agrees with Jules but he understands Catherine enough to know that she is upset at Jules’s rambling and he probably …show more content…
She is not ashamed of this trait and she even goes along to tell Jim about many escapades, she even goes ahead to explain that before one can forgive someone of an offence the score has to be settled. The problem is neither with Jules or any of her multiple partners but it is Catherine is unable to find all that she wants in one man and she has multiple partners to help meet each of her need. It is easy to want to hate Catherine but she is a character to be admired. Catherine is a woman that fears domestication and routine. She did everything in her power to avoid domestication. She wanted Jules, Jim and any of her multiple partners to constantly be aware of who was in charge in their relationship even up until the very end when she eventually takes her life and Jim’s. This action depicts Catherine’s non-chalant attitude even about her own life, it is also strongly points out Catherine’s obsession with settling scores, as this act was about settling scores with Jim. Catherine wanted her ashes to become a part of the earth and the air the same way her spirit was free in life but this was not permitted by laws. It is a metaphor for how the idea of free woman is not accepted by the patriarchal society and how society like to oppress

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