Federalism In The United States

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There are several laws that our federal, our state, and our local have passed or opposed. For us, as citizens, to know who 's in charge of the United States, our country is based off of federalism. Federalism is the method that allows two or more entities to share control over the same geographic region. It 's a principle of government that explains the correspondence joining the central government at the national level, nevertheless its constituent units at the regional, state, or local levels. Each individual in the United States is to abide by each law that id set by that city, county, state and federal government. In a federalist administration, the dominance is disputed up among the national and other leadership units. In the United States …show more content…
Federalism is relevant because it allows the human race living in different states with conflicting needs and separate interest to set policies suited to that state, but yet still be able to come together with other states as one nation. It allows the U.S. to be a nation that it simultaneously diverse and unified. Governance in the United States takes place at diverse ranks and divisions of government, which all take part in the vital decision-making process. From the U.S. Supreme Court to the compact district government, a distribution of control allows all the entities of the system to function separately while still operating together as a nation. As for us and the states federalism and the federal system defines the basic structure of the American government. There were many disagreements at the Constitutional Convention. Numerous dread that the national government was too powerful or would become too strong. As well that the states would extend the inadequate form of Articles. This that 's where federalism was born. It was created as a compromise to make sure power wasn 't all controlled by one …show more content…
The main reason why the United States is such a diverse and inclusive nation is because we are a nation of immigrants. The past four years Obama has put plans in place to allow immigration to expand so that many don 't have to hide under shadows anymore. Our founders conceived this country as a refuge for the world. Accepting immigrants into our country has kept us youthful and allowed more opportunities to arise. It has shaped our character into what we are today and made us stronger as a country. The argument that the Supreme Court has put in place is if they allow the plan that Obama has proposed will it affect the way us legal citizens live and would make sure this program proposed no financial threat to the states. How much money will it cost to issue out social security cards, valid drivers license, and other things they would need now that they are protected under the "Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents" program. Now they would be paying taxes but also be allowed to receive services such as social security. Previous lower courts have ruled in ties as well and has put Obama 's immigration plans off further and further. The US Supreme Court couldn 't agree on a decision. They are deadlock on their decision and cannot come to an agreement. This plan has divided our nation and as

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