Essay On Eyewitness Testimony

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As stated in Psychology, a definition of eyewitness testimony would be "a legal term that essentially describes when a witness or victim is recounting their firsthand experience to another person or to a court" (Psychology Glossary,2017). Eyewitness testimonies are reliable, mainly in court hearings full of eyewitnesses who might have seen an incident happening. However, eyewitness testimony is hard to believe because although a person's memory is quite incredible, it is also imperfect. Our brain is capable to remember information, however, it can also conspiracy us into remembering information that might not have happened. Research has been executed by Gene Brewer, Clark-Foos, and Richard Marsh including the thought of different researchers, such as Wright and Curci note in their experimental research on the reliability of eyewitness depending on feelings.
Article One
Clark-Foos, Brewer, and Marsh talk about reliability, also how to enlarge reliability of eyewitness testimonies. "The likeness between real and imagined events in a
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The distortion of memories can happen in several divergent methods which are memory bias, flashbulb memories, suggestibility misattribution, and incorrect memories. (Grison, 2017). The combination of those several elements shows that eyewitness testimony is definitely unreliable. There are several ways that a memory can be made up. Coxon debates about the outcome of age, kids or adult, has on the reliability and the truth about eyewitness testimonies (Coxon, Valentine, 2015). However, it all comes down to where and when the person was in that situation since everyone views things differently than the rest, furthermore that it can break or make a situation. Eyewitness testimony is unreliable when it comes to eyewitnesses because human beings most likely rely on their experiences; however, it can cause false allegation to a certain

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