Employee Voice Advantages And Disadvantages

Decent Essays
Employee Voice (EV) has become one of the most increasingly debatable subjects in the field of Human Resource Management. Generally the term refers to the extent of involvement and participation of employees in business decisions in order to assist management in establishing a stronger organizational commitment and well-balanced work field (Dudon, Wilkinson, Marchington, & Ackers, 2004, p. 22). However the concept is ever changing when identifying different literature. While referring to the view from Human Resource Management, EV is a valuable contribution that tends to lead the organization into an improved state, from employee behavior and attitudes to loyalty and commitment. Research has demonstrated the benefits that can be accrued by …show more content…
Specifically the early days of EV were strengthened with indirect trade union memberships. These unions were the face of employee representation and provided avenues to ensure workplace conditions are favorable (Benson & Brown, 2010, pp. 80-99). But the steady decline in trade union representation has seen a drastic shift towards other applicable direct and indirect representation. For example, joint consultations, a form of indirect representation has added to the framework for employees to ‘voice’ their stance. On the contrary ‘employee involvement’ as a direct representation form, has grown to play an important part in the business decision process (Benson, Employee Voice in Union and Non-union Australian Workplace, 2000, p. 453).
Interestingly, the significance of the dramatic decline in trade union representations can largely be attested to the movements of the government. In particular their drive to reform to improve working conditions for employees. As such the government’s groundbreaking Industrial Relations Reform Act 1993 and Fair Work Act 2009, which adopted enterprise bargaining at the Federal level, greatly assisted in creating an environment conducive to deteriorating union membership (Barnes, MacMillan, & Markey, 2005, pp.
…show more content…
Specifically in can be a direct result to such factors as the loss of institutional protections; changes in the role of the public sector and in forms of employment contracts; increasing employer hostility to unions and anti-union policies and action by governments, especially during recent periods of conservative commonwealth and state governments; and the weakness of workplace level union organisation to deal with such challenges (Peetz, Webb, & Jones , 2002, pp. 83-108).These factors underline the changing dimension of workplace diversity and conditions to better streamline employee conditions. However, the persistence of decline reflects the complex set of factors behind it, which have much in common with individualisation and structural changes observed elsewhere (Frege & Kelly, 2004, pp. 34-35). Interestingly the steady decline in part can be traced back to the changes in employer’s attitudes in their negotiations with unions. A more robust approach to employee conditions, specifically keeping in line with EV has shaped the modern workplace environment. In conjunction with the loss of institutional protections through a weakened centralised arbitration and award system, along with the loss of ‘closed shop’ arrangements in many locations has greatly affected the decline in trade union representations (Van Buren & Greenwood, 2008, pp.

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Labor History In America

    • 1279 Words
    • 5 Pages

    became serious issues that hampered the industrial development of America. Main reason behind the problems was the oppression of the labors. Poor health and economic condition of the labors were affecting the performance of the companies negatively. The government of U.S took strong measures for addressing The Labor Question. Democratic society, liberalization were focused more by the government for solving labor issues.…

    • 1279 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    A union gives the company less control over human resources for example if the company promotes on merit, that will likely change because unions typically promote on seniority. Same goes if the company needs to terminate a number of employees, you must terminate the most recently hired not the least productive. Listed below is a summary of the biggest disadvantages of having a union in the…

    • 1021 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Nineteenth century industrialization brought major changes to the US economy and social life. These new changes created new perspectives between employers and workers about how the economy should be run. Businessmen were corrupted and unlawful about conducting their business so it became the responsibility of the working class to defend themselves from these injustices. Industrialization came with many benefits such as cheaper labor, decreased production time, a more leisurely lifestyle for those who could afford it; however, there still were downfalls, employees suffered long hours, poor working conditions and low wages. It is important for people to see how conflicting perspectives during this period of Industrialization were stepping stones in establishing a new and improved relationship between employers and employees and reducing economic injustices in corporate…

    • 1221 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the paper you will learn how unions negatively impact the economy. For those who are unaware of what a labor union is, it is an organization of workers dedicated to protecting members’ interest and improving wages, hours, and working conditions. Unions were created to protect the workers from being taken advantage of and unsafe working conditions; however, through many decades they have become corrupt and harmful to the economy. There are many effects of the union that ties together in some way; however, there are three that affects the community in a massive way. You will be informed how the union negatively impacts education, how its presence condemns firms and industries to decades of struggle, and how they ultimately cause taxes to…

    • 739 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Organization: Cause of Resistance According to Tanner (2015), senior sponsors of the change often blame its failure on employee and middle manager resistance to change. Resistance reflect uncertainties which cause conflict to the ideal of change regardless of positions within the organization. The direct consequences of change being resist is due to management failure. With the growing rate…

    • 1386 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    what skills and qualities are important to managers working in today 's environment of changing workforce and workplace and technology ? Regardless of the career we choose, there are certain skills and abilities that are most in demand by companies when hiring new employees. In addition to the languages , always valued in the curriculum, companies start looking for other candidates skills. Managers deserve and deserve it, whose desired profile has completely changed. The companies want a facelift and look for responsible managers, with a conciliatory profile and that bet to do business in a sustainable and beneficial for the whole company.…

    • 974 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    This means that the final goals of the change will put the organization into an unwanted state of jeopardy and unethical conduct. The employees usually come up with a petition that proposes several areas of concern that the change precepts and policies need to put into consideration in terms of inclusion, exemption or amendment. Secondly, a change that is proposed when the trust of employees in the top management is dwindling then there is a high probability that it will be rejected. In the same vein, the increased incidences of mistrust lead to frustrations from the employees; even when the requirements of the change are clearly beneficial (Storm,…

    • 1729 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The growth of the production of machinery and the expansion of the machinery in the work environment would be a key component to this “de-skilling of the worker. This can clearly be seen in today’s world as many people are losing their jobs to machines and in such are “losing the race against machine”. McAfee and Brynjolfsson, authors of the book “Losing the Race Against the Machine”, state that technology is taking over “service” jobs which results in the loss of work in automation of farm and factory work. They later warn the reader: “This last repository of jobs is shrinking — fewer of us in the future may have…

    • 1578 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Case Study Starbucks

    • 710 Words
    • 3 Pages

    On the other hand, the unemployment or employees’ turnover rate has also raised that affect the organization and drive it from making changes in its hiring, retaining and training employees’ policies. In this situation the political and legal pressures are become important factors to bring change. These legal changes include regulations related to the food handling, labor regulations and several other restrictions in business practice in marketing and advertising both…

    • 710 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Labor Unions Evolution

    • 778 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Consequently, most organizations began outsourcing in search for efficient employees. Outsourcing led to radical changes in the environment. Most US employers began engaging in illegal practices, and this was detrimental to the existing unions. Most employers threatened the sympathizers of unions that they would be dismissed. Discriminations also emerged, and this made the federal government begin emphasizing on the establishment of labor unions to fight for the concerns of employees.…

    • 778 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics