Emergency Management Essay

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Emergency management is the managerial function that creates the framework for communities to develop strategies to reduce hazards and manage the aftermath. There are four phases by which emergency management manages disasters and they are mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. Emergency management is effective when the community, local, state, and federal government act responsibly by actively engaging in the activities to minimize or eliminate destruction.

Mitigation is the process of educating the communities on how to prepare for a disaster before it happens. According to Haddow, it is the means for reducing the impacts such of loss of lives and developing sustainable actions to reduce or eliminate the risks to people and property
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The movement of structures out of harm’s way is an effective land-use planning tool. The financial incentives tool has been effective with the community as this tool offers relocation assistance and provides funds for community development or renewal. Hazards such as flooding can critically damage a community and it can be very costly to rebuild, therefore, citizens of the community are strongly advised to buy insurance to cover flood planning. The federal government has programs available to assist citizens in purchasing insurance Federal Housing Administration (FHA), also the Community Assistance Program provides funding to meet negotiated objectives for reducing flood hazards. There is also the Fire Prevention program that addresses the needs of the paid and volunteer fire departments and supports prevention …show more content…
Mitigation has been denied, as a risk, as well not politically supported and the cost along with the lack of funding are some of the issues with the support for this

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