Public Education System Analysis

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The basis for any modern society is the people living in it. The citizens are the ones responsible for the way the world works today. When looking at any model that depicts the building blocks of society, one will find that education is a very important factor. In developed countries, the government regulates an educational system, paid for through taxes and other governmental funding, which give the youth of the nation the opportunity to learn. Education is widely stressed today due to the importance and the need for knowledge. Many nations focus on their public education systems when they are compared on an international scale; however, despite being poorly ranked on many of these scales, the United States cannot seem to implement the proper …show more content…
This act was passed in 1946 and created the National School Lunch Program, which gave low-cost or free school lunches to qualified students. The purpose of this bill was to “safeguard the health and well-being of the nations children…through grants-in-aid…[and by] providing an adequate supply of food and other facilities for the establishment, maintenance, operation and expansion of… school lunch programs” (Gunderson 2014). The second form of legislation to hit the public school system was in 1965 when Lyndon B. Johnson passed the Elementary And Secondary Education Act. The ESEA’s main purpose originally was to combat the gap in skills between children raised in low-income families and those from middle-class families. The three main things that the Elementary And Secondary Education Act does are putting emphasis on equal access to education, setting high standards and academic performance, and holding schools and districts accountable (Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) n.d.). The ESEA accomplishes the three goals by providing many federal programs, which focus on the individual circumstances of these districts; some of the programs are migrant education, teacher and principal quality, 21st-century community learning centers, and The Advanced Placement Program (Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) …show more content…
While the teachers are important in the classroom setting, the children are the only reason why he or she is there. Many people feel the need to point fingers when it comes to the academic success of students, but, many of the times, the teacher has nothing to do with it. In 2009, the common core curriculum came about (Sass 2014). Basically, the common core does two things: it regulates standardized testing, so instead of one state having a test and another state having a completely different test, the new common core test is the same test administered nationwide. Secondly, the common core provides lesson plans for all teachers, in all grades, levels, and subjects. The purpose of the common core is to regulate the school system to make it easier to tell how well the students are competing in school and how well they will do after school (Common Core State Standards Initiative n.d.). From an outside view of the classroom, this seems like a perfect solution to the troubled school system. However, many students find that the curriculum of the common core is useless when it comes to real-world problems and situations. There is a viral video making its way around the Internet where Jeff Bliss, a student at Duncanville High School (Texas), reacts to one of his teachers teaching style. Apparently, the teacher handed out a packet and told the students to complete it. The problem Jeff had

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