Germany's Education System

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In Germany, children take a placement test in fourth grade that determines their entire future. Around the world, school is one of the pivotal parts in a child 's life. Education has become one of the most powerful tools in the world and is necessary for our ever-developing world. Every country uses a different approach to their educational system. In the United States, we give all children equal opportunities to attend school including high school and college. All countries have an elementary school where children learn basic reading and math skills which they then continue improving upon as they go to their local version of middle school. Then some countries have their students move up to obtain at least some high school education, followed …show more content…
Most of these students work part time as apprentices while attending school. The only option these students have after graduation is to go straight into the workforce at some lower level job, or they can attend vocational training for two years in the field of their apprenticeship. All students must pass uniform standards in the United States, making it too easy for some, just right for others and too hard for the rest. Students different levels of performance is one reason the three class system is still in use today in Germany. They hope to push students to their full potential and also not leave anyone behind. Students in higher schools get an education that prepares them for a university, while in lower schools they get an education that prepares them for their monthly janitorial …show more content…
They often take a second language such as Latin or Greek depending on the school due to their cultural value. At least in the U.S.A, most of us learn Spanish, which we can use to communicate with the people from next door. While there are two main languages in the United States—English and Spanish—and Europe has 23 recognized languages (Nardelli), Germany still chooses to teach their highest achieving students two dead languages while also making them take five years of one of the 23 modern languages that are recognized by the European Union. If students are trying to beat the German three-class system and go to college without attending a real school, they should just forget it; homeschooling is illegal in Germany (Expatica). Attendance at school is compulsory, and students can face prison time if they do not attend. In the United States, students must attend some form school, but rather than serving a sentence for not going to school, parents are fined or serve jail time instead of the student. Enforcing school attendance prevents students from becoming dropouts, which is looked down upon in almost every first world

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