Ecological System Theory Essay

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Ecological System was created by Urie Bronfenbrener as an explanation of the complexity of human development. Bronfenbrener proposed that the environment has a series of nested structures; the microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, and chronosystem, which determine human behavior and development. (Berk, 2013, p.19) Each step prepares the child by giving them experiences that later they would utilize as a forming mechanism or problem solving technique. Sex education is a process that integrates the ecological system theory based on how a child receives such information and evolves in their development.
Microsystem
Sexuality is defined as a characteristic, interest or sexual activity (sexuality, n.d). Sex determines what gender traits and behaviors
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There are several examples of such behaviors that contribute to overall sexual acceptance. For example, believing in chastity and thus establishing abstinence as a protective method for sexual behavior. On the other hand, homophobia from society’s perspective can influence in a negative way the growth of sexual acceptance within Childs emotional growth (Hong, Espelage, & Kral, 2011).
Chronosystem
In addition, chronosystem involves changes over time that involve all 3 factors of the ecology theory. Such as overcoming sexual homophobia. Much of today’s media are accepting all sexual practices. They are open about sexual contraceptives, sexual preferences as well as sexual transmitted diseases. Thus, reducing the anxiety over explaining sex as well as moving away from conservative norms.
Summary and Conclusion
Overall, all ecological systems are bidirectional. Meaning they affect the individual as well as the individual affects their environment. Their systems are connected and fortify the development and perspective a child undergoes. Thus, if a positive encounter is shown a positive effect will occur, much like a domino effect. In contrast, if rejection is experienced during sexual growth and development, complications might occur due to the emotional damage a child might experience and associate with their sexual

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