The Benefits Of A Vegetarian Diet

1297 Words 6 Pages
It is a well known fact that the United States of America is a developed country where many opportunities are available. Unfortunately, one such opportunity is to eat and eat. America has become one of the top ten most overweight countries in the entire world. As America grows and grows, so does its people. However, some of the population has the desire to turn this around and slim down. Losing weight, if an individual is already obese, is a very difficult journey to accomplish. This is especially true if somebody would like to lose a substantial amount of weight. For this reason, Americans have turned to any other alternative or supplement to speed up this process and reduce the amount of effort it takes for the pounds to come off. This includes …show more content…
Key supplements that are void in a vegan diet include vitamin B12, vitamin D, and iodine. Most vital of the three, vitamin B12 is a key energy reserve in the human body. This vitamin helps with regulated functioning of the brain and the formation of red blood cells. This is important to address due to the fact that "68% of vegetarians and 83% of vegans are B12 deficient, compared to just 5% of omnivores" (Herrmann W1, Schorr H, Obeid R, Geisel J.). Ultimately, most vegans and vegetarians are not receiving as much of this vitamin as they should. As a result, vitamin B12 deficiencies have the potential to cause hardened arteries, memory loss, and learning problems. If a lack of nutrient continues, homocysteine can occur, which produces blood clots and increased oxidative stress. If this is an issue, vegans can just choose to take a daily vitamin B12 supplement, right? Well, if this is such a healthy diet, then why are supplements needed to maintain a healthy lifestyle? Although this could be an option, it is only valid to an extent. Synthetic forms of vitamins and minerals are no match against a natural source. This is due to the studies of micronutrients. The research and knowledge on micronutrients is limited, but "studies regarding the benefits of omega-3 supplementation are inconsistent, but research on …show more content…
This idea has been spread since "1971 with the publication of the surprise best-seller Diet for a Small Planet" (Whoriskey). The reason for this is because a "dietary pattern that is higher in plant-based foods... is associated with lesser environmental impact than is the current average U.S. diet" (Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee). Instead, this has proven to be wrong. Research conducted by Carnegie Mellon University has proven that adopting a vegetarian diet will "increase energy use by 38 percent, water use by ten percent and greenhouse gas emissions by six percent" (Whoriskey). A food comparison between pork and lettuce resulted that "on a per calorie basis, producing lettuce creates nearly as much greenhouse gas emissions as does beef" (Whoriskey). This research has proven the exact opposite of what vegetarians had originally stated. Sticking to a vegetarian diet will produce green house emissions at a much higher rate than an omnivorous

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