Character Analysis Of Montag In Fahrenheit 451 By Ray Bradbury

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Have you ever wondered what it is like to live in a conceited dystopian society where any possession of books is illegal? Well, in a dystopian society like Fahrenheit 451 written by Ray Bradbury, it is a community where firemen have to burn books for a living. People are not allowed to peruse books but only allowed to scan through training manuals for their jobs. When people who are against the government read the books, they will either get arrested and have a death penalty, or they either can sacrifice themselves along with their books. When the protagonist, Montag, who is also a fireman, decides to steal a book at some point during his journey, he was ordered to burn his own house down along with his books. Montag changes as a result of …show more content…
Before that occurred, when an old woman was reported, the firemen rushed to her house. After a while, when the firemen burn her books, she committed suicide by burning herself alive, so she will be able to be with her books. “The fumes of kerosene bloomed up about her” (Bradbury, pg. 37). When the woman lights herself on fire, she lit a fire inside Montag because she is fully aware that Montag might be so consumed with finding what is in the books, it will cause Montag to be more curious about what was in the book, that can cause a woman to commit suicide. This shows that the old woman was trying to prove how valuable books are by committing suicide. To sum it up, an old woman commits suicide, which brings Montag to be curious about what is in the …show more content…
Montag didn’t arrest Faber for having a book, even though he knew Faber had one. Montag and Faber talked about the things that books can do. Faber recited some lines of a monologue, a poem, and composes a comment. “That was all there was to it, really. An hour of monologue, a poem, a comment, and then without either acknowledging the fact Montag was a fireman…” (Bradbury, pg. 71). This is a significant adjustment because Faber seems to trust Montag, even though he didn’t acknowledge Montag as a fireman. Not only that, but it is also significant because if he hasn’t met Faber, then he would have remained the same fireman who burned books ever since he joined the fire department. To summarize, meeting Faber also alternates Montag’s perspective on books because he is another aspect of Montag’s

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