Summary: Direct-To-Consumer Advertising

Decent Essays
Defined by the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA), “Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) is the promotion directly to potential patients of prescription drugs through newspaper, magazine, television, and internet marketing” (1). This type of direct communication allows drug manufacturers to take advantage of its consumer’s lack of medical background and knowledge by promoting products directly to consumers in ways that could manipulate them. During drug manufacturer advertisements, consumers may be given false ideas of potential results and effectiveness of advertised medications. Pharmaceutical companies should not be allowed to advertise directly to its consumers because direct-to-consumer drug advertisements may misinform patients …show more content…
Even though the United States is only home to 5% of the world’s entire population, it also “accounts for 42% of global prescription drug spending.” These statistics indicate that nearly half of the entire world’s prescription drug users are currently being influenced by prescription drug advertisements. According to Donald L. Sullivan, direct-to-consumer advertising began as the result of an accident. Syntex Inc., introduced a new anti-inflammatory medication that gained popularity and quickly became the main topic of conversation among the public. As a result of these discussions, the prescribing of this new medication increased dramatically (32). The first known direct-to-consumer advertisement was in the 1980’s by the company Pfizer Inc., who began a campaign known as “Partners in Healthcare,” the goal of this campaign was “to increase consumer awareness of undiagnosed diseases such as diabetes, angina, arthritis, and hypertension” (32). Direct-to-consumer advertising has not always been legal, says Bryan A. Liang and Tim K. Mackey in “It’s Time to Shine the Light on Direct-to-Consumer Advertising”, direct-to-consumer advertising “experienced rapid growth in the United States when the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first liberalized its use in the 1980s and 1990s. An estimated 330% rise in DTCA spending from 1996 to 2005 …show more content…
This caused an increase of self-diagnosis and specific prescribing requests by patients (Mackey 83). Elizabeth C. Melby says that the FDA’s new guidelines for direct-to-consumer advertising released in 1997 required drug manufacturer’s to include the product warnings and fine print in their advertisements. The original intent was to increase “consumer access to prescription drug information” (Melby 328). Unfortunately, these new guidelines instead resulted in an increase in major drug manufacturer’s direct access to its consumers with a focus of increasing sales, rather than increasing consumer understanding (328). In Direct-to-Consumer Prescription Drug Advertising and the Cultivation Theory, Ashley A. Wood reported an increase of direct-to-consumer advertising in the United States:
By the year 2000, direct-to-consumer advertising became a 2.6 billion dollar industry with about 2% of total prescription drug expenditures. Direct-to-consumer advertising became the channel of choice for reaching pharmaceutical customers (Parmar & Arundhati, 2003). By 2001 the 24 most heavily advertised drugs were for chronic conditions. These chronic conditions included: allergy relief, anti-ulcer, anti-obesity, male pattern baldness, smoking cessation, erectile dysfunction, anti-diabetic, antiviral, bladder control, anti-migraine, asthma, anti-depressants, anti-arthritic, and Alzheimer’s

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    Disease Mongering Essay

    • 1290 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Moynihan, Heath and Henry argue that the pharmaceutical industry capitalises on the want of consumers to eliminate undesirable conditions. They claim that pharmaceutical companies partake in “disease mongering”: that is, they fabricate new diseases by “widening the boundaries of treatable illness”. Critics such as Healy and Dossey agree with this claim. However, I will argue that, although not unfounded, the claim that pharmaceutical companies are guilty of disease mongering is not justified. I will argue that the definition of disease presented by Moynihan, Heath and Henry does not conform to the accepted definition of disease.…

    • 1290 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, a subtle societal change began in the early 1980s with the allowance of a few print ads. According to Bradley (2010), in 1995, the pharmaceutical lobby pressured the Federal Drug Administration to allow less restrictive DTC under the guise of free speech, which allowed the mass marketing seen today. Critics of the advertising point to the exponential increase of prescription drug use from that date forward. In the most current data available from 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2014) reported, 48.5% of all persons in the United States are taking at least one prescription medication, 21.7% are taking three or more, and during the 30 days prior to collecting the data, 10.6% were taking five or…

    • 1366 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Since patients saw a new drug advertising, they believe that drug is powerful than the other they one to consume. Consequently, they will be motivate to buy the new one they saw and that will cause the “overuse of expensive, but not necessarily better drugs.” (Naomi) Moreover, The goal of advertising is to increase the incomes of pharmaceutical companies. Because “Every dollar spent on DTC ads generates four dollars in additional sales of new drugs,” (Naomi) Pharmaceutical companies invest in persuasive technique in order to convince consumers to buy their products. The over consummation of expensive drug and the motivation to raise the income of pharmaceutical companies are the causes of the increasing of medical…

    • 827 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    It leads to the downfall of affordable healthcare treatments, doctor’s integrity, and the patient’s overall health in general. Healthcare is not a field that can be piloted by finical agendas. Drug endorsements lead the medical field into an array of political disputes, and do not serve the public witch is the medical fields civil duty mentioned in the Hippocratic oath. The drug companies could benefit healthcare in more ways by depleting the use of drug endorsements using that money to focus on the drugs they produce for these healthcare providers. Drug endorsement are not benefiting the medical field in anyway except the doctors who are pocketing the endorsements given to them.…

    • 902 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The drug company wants to increase revenue. The Direct-to-consumer drug advertising is used to advertise drugs, is this ethical? The pharmaceutical industry use Direct-to-consumer drug advertising for their drugs directly to the consumer by using a range of media forms. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US began working on the advertising of prescription drugs and issued guidelines concerning the information obtained within the DTC advertising, which resulted in substantial increases in broadcast DTCA. (Business Ethics –p319) Deontological ethics is used to judge the morals of actions that peoples deal with on the observance to rules that are…

    • 1081 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Opioid Use In Nursing

    • 1518 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Opioid abuse/ misuse is also associated with increase visits to the emergency room, increase numbered of opioid related poisonings and increase use of psychiatric health. According to Hahn (2011), “The number of visits to the ER because of prescription opioid overdose increased approximately 43% between 2004 and 2006- from an USE OF OPIOIDS 5 estimated 172,726 to 247,669 visits” (p.109). Additional cost to the health care system is imposed by the Insurance fraud by drug abusers. According to Hahn (2011), “Drug diversion costs to health insurers are estimated at $72.5 billion per year” (p.109). Insurance fraud cost include fraudulent claims regarding individual who get addicted, comorbidities associated with opioid use, and prescriptions for non-threatening painful conditions.…

    • 1518 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    First of all, it is clear that most DTC advertisements in the pharmaceutical industry easily approach consumers and inject distorted information about drugs into consumers. Consumers do not realize the danger of ineffective drugs due to the embellishment of the marketing strategy. In other words, pharmaceutical product advertisers often promote their products to achieve their own goals that have a potential risk of negatively affecting the consumers ' health (Lurie 447). This argument is effective to my paper because it definitely shows that distorted information about drugs keep misleading consumers unless people need stronger regulations against indiscreet DTC advertisements. Second of all, DTC advertisements give consumers the wrong perspective, and consumers would expect false consequences.…

    • 817 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    “Pharma Bro” Martin Shkreli, CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals raised the price on a drug to treat infections in AIDS patients by 5,000%, from $13.50 a pill to $750 a pill thus shining a global spotlight on the United States’ precarious healthcare market. Shkreli has become the ogre of healthcare. Yet other companies have jacked up prices just as much as Shkreli did, with no consequences other than soaring stock prices. In September of 2016, the makers of the Epipen (The Epi-pen is only the latest in a long string of shocking and reprehensible price hikes in the pharmaceutical industry In 2015, Martin Shkreli, then CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals, became the “most hated man in America” when he purchased the antiparasitic drug, Daraprim, and raised the price, literally overnight, from $13.50 per pill to a visceral reaction-inducing $750 per pill. Even before Shkreli’s dastardly deed, pharmaceutical manufacturers have been playing fast and loose with drug prices for years.…

    • 1667 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Big Pharma Case Study

    • 1081 Words
    • 5 Pages

    When people go to their doctor, they expect their interactions with medical professionals are confidential. One of the more unethical issues that arise from this behavior is the AMA, the organization that makes the rules, is also the one that sells off the information. If doctors fill out No Contact and No Release Forms, their patient’s information will be protected from marketing purposes, but the doctors will also stop receiving health hazard warnings, and drug recall notices. Also, what happens if there is a data breach, and millions of people’s medical records are released. The practice of data mining needs to be limited to educational, and health purposes only.…

    • 1081 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Implications Of Big Pharma

    • 1450 Words
    • 6 Pages

    On the contrary, R&D costs have increased at an annual rate of 7.4% above inflation from 1980 to 2005 (Grabowski 460) and through their research they have found that 25% of each million dollar change in cash flow is directed towards increased drug expenditures. (Grabowski 462). From 1962-1996, the growth rate of deflated gross margins was 4.23%, lower than the 7.51% growth rate found for R&D (Scherer The Link Between 217). In fact, the opposite is true since companies have a vested interested to increase their research and development expenditures as it is also their source of income. They must innovate and develop new treatments and/or cures in order to remain…

    • 1450 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays