Just Do It Zafar Syed Analysis

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A crucial part of life is often overlooked, culture. Culture brings people together and makes bonding easier. However, when two separate cultures meet, things get ugly. We get used to one culture so it is hard to grasp the notion that unrelated cultures behave drastically different. A good way to solve this problem is to get as familiar with other cultures as possible. Though, there are a lot of cultures out there so a good way to understand other cultures better, is to understand how every culture works from within. This report will try to explain some of the greater problems that may occur when handling a different culture from what you are used to. Different ways cultures work that are similar but yet different. How hard it is to relate …show more content…
Doing and Being. In his article “Just do it” Zafar Syed (1999) explains that a Doing culture is a culture where the deeds that are done and the achievements that are attained are the things that define a person’s worth. People from a doing culture is often busy, not satisfied with what they got, not enjoying life to its fullest. Syed explains further, on contrary a Being culture is the total opposite, you do what you do because you like it. It is more people oriented, and relationships mean more than what kind of achievements that has been attained. America and eastern Europe is often seen as a doing culture. While Asians, Africans, Arabs, Indians are more towards a being …show more content…
If no pauses are used, they can seem rushed or unrelaxed. If long pauses are used, they can seem sluggish or not interested. Pacing in a conversation is a crucial part that is often looked over. Deborah Tannen (2000) talks about this in her text “’Don’t just sit there-interrupt!’ Pacing and Pausing in Conversation Style”. Tannen describes that pacing, tone of voice, pauses, patterns, can convey what a conversations theme will be, without explaining it. Example: We will figure out a joke is a joke without the comedian explaining it beforehand, or that a question is indeed a question. When two people encounter while having two different assumptions on how to pace a conversation, a great deal can go wrong. One might be waiting for pauses and find it hard to find any because the other person fills in the pauses because it feels wrong to have a long pause for that person. How pacing works in different people is often learnt from their parents and friends. Indians speak very fast and with little pausing, while Chinese people on the other hand might want longer pauses. Americans often interrupt each other when talking, whereas Swedes instead wait for the person to say what they want said and then talk. It can be infuriating for a non-interrupting speaker to talk to an interrupting

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