Macbeth's Destructive Actions Analysis

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Macbeth’s destructive actions throughout William Shakespeare’s famous play have horrific consequences, both for himself, and all others they affect. These appalling ramifications engender a growing execration towards the protagonist from the audience. However, despite the indubitably evil nature of his deeds, Macbeth’s introduction as a paragon of manliness and nobility serves to portray innate goodness in Macbeth’s character, and this morality, combined with his repentance of his reprobate crimes, makes it hard to justify complete condemnation of Macbeth’s actions. Moreover, whilst the ultimate responsibility for his actions lies with Macbeth, his wife and the three witches also have a large influence on his decisions. Whilst Macbeth’s abominable actions warrant utter hatred, Macbeth’s own personality and the external influences helping shape his deeds deny this, and instead leave the audience looking upon Macbeth with a sense of sorrow at Shakespeare’s tragic hero.

The crimes perpetrated by Macbeth are murders of the most execrable nature, and turn the audience against the protagonist. Perhaps chief among these is the regicide of King Duncan. Prior to the killing, Macbeth realizes how depraved such an act would be for one in his position:
“First, as I am his kinsman and his subject, strong both against the deed; then, as his host, who should against his murderer shut the door, not bear the knife myself.”
His exploitation of the
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His loathsome killings, including a shocking regicide, educes execration from the play’s viewers. However this condemnation is mitigated by significant external influences in his actions, as well as Macbeth’s introductory glory and repentance for his crimes. It is impossible for the audience to fully excoriate Macbeth upon judging him, as Shakespeare’s famous tragic hero elicits the audience’s pathos too much to be ascribed as purely

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