The Importance Of Death In Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five

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Steve Jobs once said, “No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don 't want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life 's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new.” This important passage on page 167 in Kurt Vonnegut’s book, Slaughterhouse-Five, comes from the moment in the book where Kilgore Tout is talking to a newspaper girls, when he thinks at first that it is a newspaper boy. Death is nothing, but to live beaten and shameful is to die daily. When your time comes to die, be not like those whose hearts are filled with fear of death, so that when their …show more content…
After a mention of death in the book it Kurt Vonnegut writes, “So it goes” (Vonnegut, 167). It’s interesting because this quote is trying to say that people will kill others over material things; just like the saying, “Money is the root of all evil.” Vonnegut also brings in this important quote about death: 'Would-would you mind telling me, ' he said to the guide, much deflated, 'what was so stupid about that? ' 'We know how the Universe ends, ' said the guide, 'and Earth has nothing to do with it, except that it gets wiped out, too. ' 'How-how does the Universe end? ' said Billy. 'We blow it up, experimenting with new fuels for our flying saucers. …show more content…
A place where he can be happy and not worry about other humans or human things. It really shows how bad our society has really become. Kilgore Trout created Tralfamadore in one of the books he wrote. The money tree represents the part of the world view that Billy embraces. The money tree represents the idealistic life that Billy wants. Who wouldn’t want money tree that has “twenty-dollar bills for leaves,…flowers were government bonds, [and]…fruits were diamonds” (Vonnegut, 167)? It makes perfect sense as to why Vonnegut mentions that in Kilgore Trout’s book that people “kill each other around the roots [probably trying to get its wealth] and [their dead bodies] make very good fertilizer” (Vonnegut, 167). It’s that part of a fantasy life style that Billy “lives in” when he supposedly goes to the planet of

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