The Importance Of Culture In Nursing

1236 Words 5 Pages
I believe nursing is a knowledge-driven profession involving nurses and patient interaction within their cultural background respectively. Nurses should provide care that does not discriminate, but rather encompass culture, religion, or race. Culture is viewed as the thoughts, traditions, and social conduct of a specific individual or society, whereas discrimination as a biased treatment of diverse classes of individuals, particularly on the grounds of race, age, or sex. This does not exclude culturally sensitive care which could be defined as the level of information based abilities needed to give viable clinical consideration to patients from a specific ethnic or racial gathering. They must have the capacity to embrace the significance of …show more content…
He further said that as health professionals, we had to think about how our beliefs would affect what we did as others had diverse conviction. Most importantly, (Napier et al., 2014) clearly stated that one’s culture was relatively and comparatively hard to understand, so as to objectively criticise the subjective nature of their work. Even more, that nurses found it difficult to acknowledge the cultural importance and to be recognised within cultural immersion. Also, Harding (2013) postulated that the safety of a culture put nurses in clashing moral circumstances while caring for patients as well as respecting and valuing their own cultural values. (Morís de la Tassa et al. 2013) pointed out that, comprehensive and collaborative patients that got involved in their own care were not only able to learn ways of dealing with health care risks but also, to share their own experiences and understanding. In the end, this improved the safety of patients, especially those in Spain. It helped nurses as well in …show more content…
Besides, it is very hard to understand one’s culture and its relevance since it’s very difficult to acknowledge culture and to culturally immerse with it. As seen above, there’s an inconsistence with the patient’s cultural values and norms and what the deep-rooted culture expects of the patient. To improve patient safety, it requires comprehension and collaboration for patients to understand and share their experiences, and for nurses to overcome their resistance towards these patients rather than to focus on one’s culture. At the end of the day, nobody has the privilege to judge one’s culture. Above all, the creation of cultural safety and diversity spear heads multiculturalism in health facilities and communities, to be precise the Maori of the Aboriginal people. It is also imperative for medical workers to be acquitted with key needs for the Islamic community especially the women. At the same time, culture gives a lens through which an individual, society views the entire health system and thus cultural competence is emphasised for the benefit of both the patient and the health professional. A nurse has to acknowledge one’s culture; otherwise it may have an impaction on the patient’s care. She or he must understand that culture is interpreted differently in health, in order to tackle cultural

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