Dr. Moreau And God Analysis

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The definition of humanity is perpetually under question. From current issues such as abortion, to historical issues such as the Salem Witch Trials, who or what society defines as a human deserving of equal treatment seems to elude a concrete decision. When Charles Darwin published his Theory of Evolution, the grounds of creationism were shook to the core. While religion had long been thought to provide an explanation for why and how the human race got here, Darwin’s ground breaking assertion led many to either reject his theory, or to reject religion. Through this divide, most citizens were left to decide for his or herself who or what to define as human. Mark Twain attempts to humorously bridge this divide by asking and answering his own …show more content…
Moreau and God, these corresponding characteristics are superficial. In order to truly understand the purpose of Wells’s analogy between Dr. Moreau and God, the differences between these two figures must be analyzed. An intangible entity, intention, may be the biggest and most crucial difference relating Dr. Moreau and God. While yes, they both may have intended to create a new species as a way to somehow further “humanity,” Dr. Moreau seems to display an utter indifference towards his creations. Instead of displaying any sort of compassion or love towards the monsters, Dr. Moreau explains that he continues with his trial and error vivisectioning, “not heeding anything but the question I was pursuing” (Wells 56). While one could certainly argue that both Dr. Moreau and God exhibit a type of “tough love” toward their respective creations, their purpose behind their actions ultimately contrast them as authorities. God may have wreaked havoc upon his creations just like Dr. Moreau punishes his, yet throughout the Bible (such as in Genesis or Exodus), God wants to better the human species, while Dr. Moreau simply wants repress his creations in order to continue pursuing answers to his own questions. Moreover, unlike God, Dr. Moreau has a patronizing view of The Beast People, calling their lifestyle a sort of “mockery of rational life” while referring to their chanted law pertaining to resisting their animalistic urges …show more content…
Moreau and God, this means nothing if there is no message behind it. Although Dr. Moreau may not perfectly fit the role of the island’s God, this may be because Wells is suggesting that the Judeo-Christian God is not as remarkable as his followers believe. Instead, Wells could be implying that the participants of organized religion are blindly following a leader without questioning his qualifications or ability to even rise to the occasion of leading. While the definition of humanity on the island is unquestionably skewed, it still acts as a microcosm for society as a whole. Through this strange community and relationship between The Beast People and their leader, Wells conveys to the reader that evolution does not only consist of physical and psychological changes, but also role, purpose, and perspective changes. Likewise, he continues this idea by stripping away the magnificence of God and religion in general by insinuating that humans can evolve into their own God like creatures. Maybe we are, in Wells’s perspective, our own “monkeys” that are disappointed in ourselves and therefore search to elect a “heavenly father” in an attempt to find an explanation for the evolutions we cannot

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