Dr. Moreau And God Analysis

Superior Essays
The definition of humanity is perpetually under question. From current issues such as abortion, to historical issues such as the Salem Witch Trials, who or what society defines as a human deserving of equal treatment seems to elude a concrete decision. When Charles Darwin published his Theory of Evolution, the grounds of creationism were shook to the core. While religion had long been thought to provide an explanation for why and how the human race got here, Darwin’s ground breaking assertion led many to either reject his theory, or to reject religion. Through this divide, most citizens were left to decide for his or herself who or what to define as human. Mark Twain attempts to humorously bridge this divide by asking and answering his own …show more content…
Moreau and God, these corresponding characteristics are superficial. In order to truly understand the purpose of Wells’s analogy between Dr. Moreau and God, the differences between these two figures must be analyzed. An intangible entity, intention, may be the biggest and most crucial difference relating Dr. Moreau and God. While yes, they both may have intended to create a new species as a way to somehow further “humanity,” Dr. Moreau seems to display an utter indifference towards his creations. Instead of displaying any sort of compassion or love towards the monsters, Dr. Moreau explains that he continues with his trial and error vivisectioning, “not heeding anything but the question I was pursuing” (Wells 56). While one could certainly argue that both Dr. Moreau and God exhibit a type of “tough love” toward their respective creations, their purpose behind their actions ultimately contrast them as authorities. God may have wreaked havoc upon his creations just like Dr. Moreau punishes his, yet throughout the Bible (such as in Genesis or Exodus), God wants to better the human species, while Dr. Moreau simply wants repress his creations in order to continue pursuing answers to his own questions. Moreover, unlike God, Dr. Moreau has a patronizing view of The Beast People, calling their lifestyle a sort of “mockery of rational life” while referring to their chanted law pertaining to resisting their animalistic urges …show more content…
Moreau and God, this means nothing if there is no message behind it. Although Dr. Moreau may not perfectly fit the role of the island’s God, this may be because Wells is suggesting that the Judeo-Christian God is not as remarkable as his followers believe. Instead, Wells could be implying that the participants of organized religion are blindly following a leader without questioning his qualifications or ability to even rise to the occasion of leading. While the definition of humanity on the island is unquestionably skewed, it still acts as a microcosm for society as a whole. Through this strange community and relationship between The Beast People and their leader, Wells conveys to the reader that evolution does not only consist of physical and psychological changes, but also role, purpose, and perspective changes. Likewise, he continues this idea by stripping away the magnificence of God and religion in general by insinuating that humans can evolve into their own God like creatures. Maybe we are, in Wells’s perspective, our own “monkeys” that are disappointed in ourselves and therefore search to elect a “heavenly father” in an attempt to find an explanation for the evolutions we cannot

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    God created humans with the will to choose the good in a battle between good and evil. However, He also granted the power to choose evil. Mackie argues why, then, did God not use His powers to create a world that always freely choose right? “His failure to avail himself of this possibility is inconsistent with his being both omnipotent and wholly good” [1;348]. Humans describe things using comparative methods.…

    • 983 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In this chapter, Zophar continues talking to Job. Zophar asks Job, “Do you not know…that the exulting of the wicked is short, and the joy of the godless but for a moment?” (Job 20:4). I imagine Zophar is using this as a direct attack on Job’s life. To Zophar, he believes that one’s works will determine their place in life. Since Zophar does not believe that Job was genuinely doing the will of the Lord, I imagine he wanted to tell Job that his worldly success was built on the foundation of evil and not serving God.…

    • 1926 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In regard to free will, Penick said Aquinas had struggled to make sense of how God is all knowing, even of our actions, yet when humans act in evil, God blames us. Aquinas concluded that God works necessarily and contingently. When Aquinas makes that statement, he is neglecting God’s sovereignty. Because Aquinas failed to capture the full…

    • 1138 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    God Allows Evil Essay

    • 1801 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Their argument is that if God really did exist (and he was a good/omnipotent God), then evil would not exist because he would not allow it to. These people are looking for answers as to why the cruelty and evil from events such the Crusades or the Holocaust were allowed to happen. Their argument comes from a place of compassion and justice for the victims of evil and cruelty (which eventually is all of us). This is a fair question that I believe deserves an answer. A second criticism of God is based on natural evil, rather than moral evil.…

    • 1801 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Book Of Job Essay

    • 1621 Words
    • 6 Pages

    He gives two reasons on the purpose of the book of Job; divine justice and concept of suffering. There is a “mistaken assumption that personal sin is always the cause of suffering….every case of suffering presumes prior personal sin.” Now with divine justice he says that through God allowing Job to suffer shows that God doesn’t have to be held to human standards because he is God. God is the one who defines justice, so whatever he does is just, even if it doesn’t look that way to human eyes. Estes goes on to say “The sovereign God is not a captive to a rigid law of retribution, but rather is free to do what appears mysterious to humans.” We as humans need to know that sometimes God allows bad things to happen to us that we don’t know why he allows it, but God is the one who created us and rules over us. We need to know that whatever He does is just and for a purpose that we as humans won’t always understand.…

    • 1621 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Hosea 4:6 says, “My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge: because thou hast rejected knowledge” The Bible also says in Proverbs 14:12 “There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way of death.” Like our examples showed us, we cannot always rely on our own senses. Sometimes what we perceive is different than what the eyes of someone else has perceived. The only time we should be uncertain of our beliefs is if we cannot prove it or support it. However, our beliefs should never be uncertain because they are supported by the everlasting Word of God. Hebrews 4:12 says, “For the word of God is alive and powerful.…

    • 809 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    God creates humans in his image, who are later defined as being inherently evil. God also harshly punishes humans for even minor infractions. Finally, God causes suffering without just cause, or providing a just explanation. When observing all of these actions, it becomes impossible to see God as good based on our texts. The first reason the texts do not support the idea of a good God is that one of his main creations, humans, are described as inherently evil.…

    • 1712 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    He says this only proves that God does not have ultimate power he restricts himself because he allowed good and bad to not exist without each other and he cannot stop it. Mackie also argues that “Evil is necessary as a means to good." He states that this also brings restriction to Gods omnipotence, because if evil is necessary, then why did God create it, he could have made the world in a different way where evil does not have to depend on good to exist, why did he not just create the good. Another…

    • 1163 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    However, by doing so, ecclesiastics had to build a complex argumentation to avoid mention the principle of the Devil and became lost in it, creating more confusion than clarification. Additionally, it meant that God was now responsible for evil, a theory that thinkers had been trying to discredit since the beginning of the religion. Despite all their efforts to maintain Christianity afloat, it just could not be done, skeptics soon had the upper hand and Satan bite the dust; the Devil suffered the blunt of the attacks as people began to think that evil came directly from humanity and not from an external source tempting the…

    • 709 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Humanity naturally has controversy over scientific observations and religious beliefs. This whole issue of how humanity portraying nature as a monstrous theory against human beliefs all originated through the observation of Charles Darwin Natural Selection. Humanity has the drive to fight for what they believe in, but is what they believe in the actual truth? Charles Darwin stated that humans do not have the mind capability to view the changes of Natural Selection, thus people not believing. There are mysteries we will never know about because the human potential is not enough.…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays