The Importance Of Corruption In Police

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The society at large hypothesis is another component of public corruption. This hypothesis also incorporates the slippery slope theory. When some in the public believe that officers would accept gratuities, they would offer it to them with the expectation of favors. Sometimes officers would be paid small bribes for looking the other way so that the officer can make an illegal profit. Corruption may become routine when police officer believes that other parts of the criminal justice system are corrupt. When police believe that a violator will buy relief from a corrupt judge, they may sell relief themselves (Delattre, 2011). The structural or affiliation hypothesis is another component of public corruption. If a police officer learns from senior officers …show more content…
The answer to the aforementioned question is training. Training classes for law enforcement officers should reiterate their oath and obligation to perform assignments and help protect those that they may not agree with due to political, religious or whatever other reasons. Different scenarios should be giving during the training course and officers should be allowed to voice their opinions on why the scenario may make them uncomfortable etc. Communication and honest dialogue is key to any type of training. In conclusion, there are many different topics and dilemmas that face law enforcement officers in the field today. Topics range from the changes of the police force due to terrorism and controversies that some celebrities help put under a public microscope. Ethical components of police corruption will continually have to be addressed by police departments and their leadership. In the end, it’s important for law enforcement officers to remember their obligation to serve their position with duty and the responsibility that a sacred public position gives

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