The Importance Of Core Skills

1488 Words 6 Pages
Universities throughout history have shaped the minds of university graduates and have provided them with knowledge, core skills and attributes during an age of cultural diversity and increasing internationalisation (Holowchak, 2009). Universities have been open to students in the West for eight centuries (Wallace, Schirato & Bright, 1999), however in recent decades, there is expectation that a university education prepares graduates for professional careers with generic skills and attributes (Levy & Treacey, 2015, p. 118); however I will be referring generic skills as core skills throughout this essay. But as will be discussed, I will explore why it is important universities provide graduates with core skills such as critical thinking and …show more content…
76) and not specific to work in one particular occupation or industry, although core skills are important for work, education and life generally, however it can be difficult to embed and teach graduate attributes because the definition of the term is still unclear (Levy & Treacey, 2015, p. 118). One particular important core skill is critical thinking that is the ability to think clearly and rationally that also includes the ability to engage in reflective and independent thinking, which graduates use in essay writings for instance when arguing points and providing evidence to support their ideas (Greetham, 2003). Therefore, universities today follow in the footsteps of Greek philosopher Socrates, who taught graduates the importance of developing critical thinking skills so that they can learn to identify the fallacies, the suppressed evidenced and the underdeveloped arguments that conceal more then what they reveal (Greetham, 2003). Universities are based on certain core principle values including an interest in knowledge, reason, openness, honesty, tolerance, scepticism, concern for truth and critique which students are expected to follow (Wallace et al., …show more content…
states that when a student graduate who holds an undergraduate degree from an Australian university, that he or she not only holds a qualification of an international standard, but also hopefully acquired what was quaintly referred to as ‘a taste of learning’ (1994). Therefore graduates in professions such as law, medicine and engineering which are understood to be ‘learned professions’ (Gutting, 2011) would require the necessary attributes for lifelong learning due to evolving technology and as society develops mean that graduates will often need to acquire postgraduate or addition studies throughout their career (Candy et al. 1994). Some graduates come out of university with a thirst for knowledge and with this attitude and with the acquisition of learning skills, is what genuinely provides them for a lifetime of learning (Levy & Treacey, 2015, p. 121). Australian universities will continue to ensure that graduates are skilled and equipped with having technical skills, for instance surgeons who are capable to cut a straight line down an abdomen or an accountant who can add and subtract and good practice, being thoughtful or reflective and having a strong ethical sense (Watts,

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