What Is The Theme Of Relationship In Night By Elie Wiesel

1747 Words 7 Pages
Abandoning family, wanting to never find one’s family again, forgetting one’s loved ones, being disinclined to help them and becoming indifferent to their own death, adversities, and anguish are all things that Elie Wiesel’s experiences at Auschwitz made of him. In the memoir Night, by Elie Wiesel, Elie takes the readers through the battle of him struggling to maintain just treatment towards his father and guides the readers through his behavioral and ethical changes in relation to the battle. Starting from Elie yearning to never become disloyal and hostile towards his father, to then turning neutral in his attitude towards his father, to finally outright feeling that his father is burdensome. The aftermath of this internal battle is the subsequent …show more content…
Elie and his father were transferred from camp to camp, remaining together the entire time, and ultimately end up at Auschwitz. The memoir displays Elie’s connection with his father and the bond between Elie and his father is the paramount focal point of the novel (it is also important to note that Elie and his father were not as closely acquainted before arriving at the concentration camp). At the very beginning of the book, Elie wanted for nothing but to be with his dad and to protect him by any means; the most important goal for Elie was that he wanted to not cower and neglect his father when he was in danger. It was also important for Elie to not transmute into the other selfish sons he had seen at the camp. As the book progresses, however, Elie faces numerous experiences and suffers at the expense of them leading to Elie being influenced by the experiences and, as a consequence, slowly making him care less and less about his …show more content…
Elie’s battle commences around the time he witnesses a rabbi’s son abandon his father (the rabbi is referred to as “Rabbi Eliahu” in the book). Rabbi Eliahu, nonetheless, continues to search for his son and Elie hopes that he never turns out like his son. Elie realizes, “A terrible thought crossed my mind: What if he [the rabbi’s son] had wanted to be rid of his father? He had felt his father growing weaker and, believing that the end was near, had thought by this separation to free himself of a burden that could diminish his own chance for survival.” (91). This is where Elie truly begins to uncover the logic behind abandoning a loved one in order to survive and witnesses it happening right before his eyes, which is dangerous as it can influence Elie and does end up influencing Elie. Elie is already struggling to survive and live at a death camp whilst also caring for his father; now he is grappling with this idea of abandonment that is present in his mind and can be difficult to follow through with. Additionally, if he does not follow through with it, it will cause him great shame. Now Elie is worried what he will turn into; a new anxiety to

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