Benefits Of Individual Counseling

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Selection of group members. According to the American Counseling Association (2014) groups leaders have to be careful in their selection of group members. Not every person that may be experiencing the same or a similar issue is mentally fit to be part of a group session. As Corey, Corey, and Haynes (2014) mentions, the outcome of a group session is often irregular; certain topics may affect specific members in unpredictable way. This is why it is important in choosing the right members for each groups. If a person becomes emotional or has frequent outburst, this can become disruptive to the group. Some individuals fit well in individual counseling where it is more of a one-on-one interaction and less pressure to speak up or participate (Corey, …show more content…
This allows the counselor to dig deeper into the needs of the client and provide them with their utmost attention without the need to share as in other forms of counseling. Clients in individual therapy develop a more trusting and secure relationship with counselors as they become aware that their needs are priority; they are not require to share their session time with others.
Individual counseling can be seen as more beneficial than group counseling for the simple reason that it provide clients suffering from difficult issues to have that privacy. For example, for individuals who are depressed, suffer from anxiety, or are antisocial may find it difficult to be around others. Also, some client will find it hard to discuss their problems in a group setting; in these circumstances a group setting would not be ideal and in turn may deter or hinder a client’s potential to get the appropriate aid
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As previously mentioned, individual therapy can be viewed as a more personal approach. Dual relationships can occur in group and individual counseling; however, it typically can have negative annotations in individual therapy due to the “intimate” nature of the counseling process (Corey, Corey, & Callanan, 2011). In some instances, it can be beneficial to clients in the sense that they feel the focus is on them only rather than five or six other group members at a time. A client may also associate the trust formed in the therapeutic relationship as similar to that of a close friendship. However, it is imperative that counselors pay close attention to these direct cues and draw back without hurting the client 's feelings and ruining the trust. For counselors who have good ethical standards, the risk of endangering the well-being of their clients is minimal to none because their professional judgement is intact, thus minimizing the change of misconduct or malpractice (Sperry, 2005, p.

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