The Importance Of Confession

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Register to read the introduction… “Confess” literally means to “agree with” God about that sin. If we still defend the sinful thought or act in any way, we have not confessed. True confession produces a desire to change. But even if we sin the same way again, the solution is again confession. Confessing sin is a major truth of the Christian’s life. Confession brings the cleansing Christ provided (1 John 1:7). All sin is already forgiven, but we claim and experience that forgiveness by confession. The joy of fellowship with God is then restored. The Holy Spirit is then free to “fill us” and change. Our remedy is the death of Christ (1 John 1:7), trust in Christ, and confessing our sin (1 John 1:9) (Romans …show more content…
Paul gives us a list of grave sins. He states that anyone who commits these sins shall not enter the kingdom of God. "Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are these; Adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, envying’s, murders, drunkenness, raveling’s, and such like: of the which I tell you before, as I have also told you in time past, that they which do such things shall not inherit the kingdom of God" (Galatians 5:19-20). Paul also tells the Corinthians, "know you no that the unjust shall not possess the kingdom of God? Do not err: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor the effeminate, nor liars with mankind, nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards nor railers, nor extortions shall possess the kingdom of God" (1 Corinthians 6:9-10). These sins constitute grave matter, and if they are committed willingly and with full consent, constitute mortal sin. If left un-reconciled, mortal sins may lead to eternal separation from God, traditionally called the …show more content…
This was opposed by theologians like St. Gregory Nazianzen, who maintained this would have made Satan equal to God. * Martin Luther and John Calvin, leaders of the Protestant Reformation, owed much to Anselm's theory and taught that Christ, the only sinless person, was obedient to take upon Himself the penalty for the sins. Calvin advocated the doctrine of limited atonement, which teaches that the atonement applies only to the sins of the elect rather than to all of humanity. * D.L. Moody once said, "If you are under the power of evil, and you want to get under the power of God, cry to Him to bring you over to His service; cry to Him to take you into His army. He will hear you; He will come to you, and, if need be, He will send a legion of angels to help you to fight your way up to heaven. God will take you by the right hand and lead you through this wilderness, over death, and take you right into His kingdom.” That is what the Jesus came to do. He has never deceived us; just say here; "Christ is my deliverer."" Retrieved from

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