The Importance Of Computers In The Computer War

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Ever since World War II, computers have been increasing in importance in perspective to war. The nation with the stronger computer tends to win the war, or at very least have the advantage in the war. Starting in World War II computers became prominent thanks to the advancements made by the British and in specific, Alan Turing. Over years military grade computers have greatly improved from what they were in the time of The Colossus to the computers simulations of the Cold War to the drone based militaries present today in the United States. The invention and development of the computer has been the largest change in war in history as it has completely changed how war was fought. Prior to the invention of the computer war was fought with …show more content…
In 1941, Turing and his cohorts deciphered the German 's original Enigma cypher by hand, which made it possible to let the Allies figure out where the German U-boats were before the Germans could even attack. The issue with deciphering the system was that it took too much time and energy out of those deciphering the Enigma. Turing and several other members of the British Code and Cypher School, became determined to develop something that would not put as much stress on them. Within a year they developed The Colossus, which would take in intercepted German messages, and the operators would make the computer cypher through the message until they determined the message would become readable. They did this for every knew cypher the Germans made. So within hours to days of creating the new cyphers they would be broken. This made it incredibly easy to combat the Axis Powers and eventually concluded with the Axis 's surrender. The Colossus changed the layout of war as prior to its invention, militant groups would not be able to decode the opposing groups messages without having a double agent leaking …show more content…
Nuclear simulation began with the mass manufacturing of nuclear explosives in both the United States and the Soviet Union. Simulating the explosions was easier than physically testing the "Nukes", as nothing would be at risk if they just ran a simulation of what would happen. These testings used extremely realistic statistics to figure out how many missiles would be necessary to completely destroy the opposing nation if the situation called for it. These simulations tested two things: how much smoke would be created and how much radiational aerosol would be created by each explosives (Nuclear War, 237). Each equation is remarkable, for determining mass of the smoke they multiplied the explosive yield over burnable area of each bomb, the area ignited by flames from the bomb being dropped, the amount of fuel burned for each meter squared, the amount of fuel remaining at the time of explosion, and the fractional amount of explosion released as a smoke like vapor (Nuclear War, 237). The equation for determining the radiation released from each bomb they assumed based on how much the bomb weighed they could determine the aerosol cloud it would create, and the radiation is the amount of direct light going over the aerosol divided by the direct light that goes under the aerosol (Nuclear War, 238). They measured the radiation in megatons (1,000,000 tons per megaton) meaning the radiation released is a massive amount. This simulation

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