Free College Proposal

1083 Words 5 Pages
The majority of Americans feel there is value in a college education, so much so, that even Americans without a college degree believe that post high school education is important. The most recent Gallup poll indicates that 25% of all college graduates in the U.S. fail to thrive in their overall careers (Busteed). Students and parents making their college decision should not be swayed solely on the prestige of the high costs institutions, but rather the quality of education students will receive. This poll also revealed that “graduates with higher amounts of student loan debt are less likely to be thriving in their overall well-being after college” (Busteed). Tuition and fees at public colleges soared a record to 14 percent this year, continuing …show more content…
There are many problems with Sander’s free college proposal. First, Sander’s plan does nothing to fix the actual problem. Every metric and survey has shown that college is still worth it from a financial and societal perspective despite the rising costs to attend. The real issue is that the cost to attend college has risen to the point where most people who want to go to college and who are qualified, cannot afford to go. Between 1982 and 2013, the cost of tuition, room, board, and fees at four year colleges and universities rose 130 percent. It was found that “between 1998 and 2008, America’s private colleges increased spending on instruction by 22 percent, while increasing spending on administration and staff support by 36 percent” (Ginsberg). The spending at both private and public universities and colleges on infrastructure and administration increased at such a rapid rate, which resulted in a higher cost of tuition for the …show more content…
As a nation, we want more people to have access to higher education. However, there is a big difference between making something free versus making something accessible. So, who does tuition-free public university really benefit? If the goal of this policy is to give everyone an equal opportunity to continue their education, making policies for colleges and universities is not the only solution. Sander’s plan does not address the cause of the problems of obtaining higher education. It only targets a select group of young people and fails to help a significant portion of our population

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