The Importance Of Climate Change In Fiji

1108 Words 5 Pages
On 18 November 2016, Fiji 's Prime Minister Frank Bainimarama made an emotional appeal to the next US President: "President-elect Trump, I formally invite you to Fiji…we will show you how we are already having to move entire communities out of the way of the rising seas…the world looks to America for leadership as we work together to confront this challenge to our survival and the well-being of our planet.” This desperate appeal of a statesman demonstrates the dilemma of climate change: It has regional economic and security implication but the solutions to this partially human caused problem have to be found on the global level in a consensus. There are incentives for nations, to avoid involved costs for countering climate change. On the other …show more content…
Human economic activities, accelerated by globalized trade, contributing to an increase in average global temperatures. Primary cause is an increase in “greenhouse” gases such as Carbon Dioxide (CO2). The levels CO2 gas have risen to levels human mankind has not measured before. CO2 emissions occur as a by-product of virtually every type of economic activity, from car exhaust gases, coal-burning energy production, industrial production, or livestock farming. As a conclusion, warmer average temperatures thus lead to a change in climate. In addition, scientists predicted that global climate change will have severe effects, such as loss of sea ice, accelerated sea level rise, heat waves, and impacts on farming. There is a consensus among scientists that all countries – some more, some less - will be affected by anthropogenic climate change unless worldwide emissions of CO2 gases will be drastically decreased over the next decades. Efforts to mitigate CO2 emissions require investments in new technology and changes in human consumption behavior. Consequently, modifications to common economic activities as of today causing immense costs to states and their national economies and …show more content…
On the other hand, national mitigation policies remain a subject of intense debate. Accordingly, the international context mainly affects how governments approach climate policy. Climate policies are developed on two different levels. At one level, the world’s governments interact in the framework of international climate regimes, such as the Kyoto Protocol. Thereby, each state strives to benefit from the global climate change regime while reducing their costs. As of now, there is no supranational authority with a regulating power. This can be considered as a “game” of voluntary contributions to a public good: climate stabilization. Thus, there is a chance of “freeriding” states. At the national level, climate policies have to be ratified by national governments. Most of the concurred policies include mitigation goals of CO2 emissions. This can be achieved by reducing the burning of fossil fuels (oil, coal, gas) for power generation. Another strategy is the rise of carbon taxes for national CO2 emissions. But those taxes are difficult to implement by national governments, because politicians have to face backlashes from companies. Moreover, they argue, that they face a loss of competitiveness because of rising costs for technology development. Alternative policies include subsidizing energy from renewable energy sources, such as wind or solar panels. A number of international

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