The Importance Of Classroom's Atmosphere

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Classroom’s Atmosphere The Classroom’s Atmosphere is vital to a Student’s success and impacts students in many ways. Classroom’s Atmosphere talks about the ventilation inside the classroom, the mood inside the classroom, and the overall color and brightness of the classroom. Ms. Firestone states that a negative learning environment or setting that adversely affects student learning, can affect the students in many ways such as low student achievement, poor behavior, student anxiety, or depression. Positive learning environment, or one that allows students to feel comfortable and confident as learners. One way to build positive learning environment is to know the effects of the colors of the wall, the brightness inside the classroom because …show more content…
Same study from the University of British Columbia found that blue brought out students’ creativity. Blue elicits a positive, calming emotional response, making people happier. A blue room would be a good location for a creative brainstorming session, the researcher concluded. Darker colors elicit stronger reactions that’s why red creates such a strong reaction while blue makes people to relax. Color consultants recommended painting rooms with red or orange to stimulate conversation. Blue, green, or lavender are good color for classroom’s walls because they create calm environment that makes the students to relax and be calm inside their classroom instead of being pressured and stressed that makes their behavior …show more content…
In the ASHRAE Handbook- HVAC Applications, Chapter 6, the American society of heating, refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers recommends that design considerations for education facilities must take into account that today’s school are used for functions year-round. University of Tulsa conducted a study about Classroom Ventilation affects Student performance and it states that students in well-ventilated classrooms perform significantly better on standardized test than their peers who receive inadequate fresh air. “ Far too many schools fall short of providing a healthy learning environment for children. By doing something as simple as introducing more fresh air into the classrooms, schools potentially could help every student perform at higher level,” said by Richard Shaughnessy, program director of Indoor Air Quality Research at TU and a research associate in the Department of Chemical Engineering. In other countries, such as United Kingdom they designed their classroom with large, opening windows and appropriate room aspect ratios to enable the properly educated user to maintain reasonably ventilated conditions ( Dwyer, 2015 ). “ With poor ventilation, all

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