The Importance Of Children In Education

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Children with disabilities are considered invisible. They are among the most vulnerable and most excluded in the world. Their rights are usually violated and these children are often hidden at home or placed in special institutions. Children with disabilities are faced with significant hurdles in accessing education and as a result, they miss out on education. Sometimes they grow up apart or hidden from their families. Their parents fear that their children with disabilities will be mocked. Additionally, parents fear that they also will not have a chance to take part in society. This makes children with disabilities invisible and abandoned by their governments (Lawrence 2014). When parents discover that their child has a disability, they …show more content…
They also have a difficult time expressing their emotions appropriately. The level of disability and the combination of symptoms greatly varies from person to person. Students with autism may start to cry, yell, or laugh hysterically for no reason. They may also demonstrate aggressive or disruptive behavior when they are stressed (Plavnick 2014). I have had clients who break things, hit others, and even harm themselves. It is possible that this can occur in the classroom so one classroom strategy to help the student exhibit how they feel would for them to use a visual. In their binder, the visual will have two pieces. The top piece will read: “I feel _______” and the bottom piece will read: “ I need _______”. On the next page will be a word bank so if the student feels “frustrated” they will need “to ask for a break”. The social, academic, and emotional classroom management skills are also applicable in typical children as well as students with …show more content…
Social skills are the specific behaviors when interacting with others. Lack of social skills in students with ED can result in aggression, loneliness, academic failure, and substance abuse (Holmes 2000). This is just to name a few. Effective social problem solving requires reading their own feelings and others’ feelings and this is why social skill instruction in the classroom may include role-playing, according to Holmes, suggest extensive use of role-playing exercises to help young adults with mental retardation develop automaticity with small talk appropriate to the workplace. They suggest the following, role playing an interaction that includes acting out social errors, spotting the errors, and correcting them in a subsequent role play (with more able young adults). Examples of errors include inappropriate topics for small talk; inappropriately long response or no response when one is needed; inappropriately detailed response; and use of a small-talk formula when it is not appropriate. For students with ED, role-playing can provide an opportunity to practice appropriate small talk, a social skill that is key to acceptance in the workplace (Wery

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