The Importance Of Child Prevention

1092 Words 4 Pages
Prevention programs should be pursued with serious vigour. Especially in view of the fact that prevention programs over incarceration. Punishment and treatment, both have merit throughout the United States a few agree a great deal with one than the other. Rehabilitation and treatment programs can offer an opportunity for all juvenile offenders before outcry that the offenders deserve punishment. However, the public is concerned and demand the stricter penalties while others believe in the success of treatment programs. “Public opinion is so widely positive on the issue of progressive policies for wayward youths that ‘child saving’ can be considered a core cultural belief. Not only do people seem to favor such policies, but there is also evidence …show more content…
Therefore, prevention starts at an early stage in life before delinquent behavior occurs. “How parents interact with their children and, in particular, their disciplinary styles, can increase or decrease the likelihood of later antisocial and delinquent behavior by their offspring” (National Research, 200, 108). Intervention can begin through family, school and peer-group intervention and study has suggested that it has deterred delinquency if done before age 10. Fetal substance exposure, prenatal difficulties, an abusive and violent family are all risk factors related to poorer executive functioning. Therefore, reducing known risk factors will reduce delinquency. The most popular risk factor is anti-social tendency which occurs in adolescence and can be identified early in order to prevent further violent behavior. Risk factors are meant to be diffused and children are less likely to misbehave. Some preventive programs are Nurse-Family Partnership, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. Through these programs, violence is prevented and Juveniles are granted an opportunity to behave accordingly avoiding the Juvenile Justice system …show more content…
Many juveniles continue involvement in delinquent behavior. If prevention programs are not introduced early in childhood; delinquency will occur followed by recidivism. Retaining juveniles in the juvenile justice system are evidently effective. Therefore, when juveniles are transferred to adult court, they are more likely to recidivate. “Risk factors such as offense history, problem behavior, and family involvement were explored. Youth involved in this study were incarcerated from 2 to 4 years and follow-up was conducted between 2 to 5.8 years post-release. The overall recidivism rate for this population was 79.9%. Factors that were found to be predictive of recidivism included a more extensive and serious offense history, lack of empathy and/or conscience, antisocial behavior during treatment, and family problems” (Baduszek, 2014, 259). The juvenile justice system has created a system that fails to prevent recidivism and focuses mostly on punishment instead. Juveniles are sent to years in prison as punishment instead of for punishment. Therefore, relapsing is easy when the offense was substance abuse and programs aren’t offered after release. The highest increase in recidivism is seen when a juvenile transfers to criminal court. Clearly, recidivism can be decreased because there’s evident studies suggesting the do’s

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