Why Is Charlemagne A Good Ruler

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Charlemagne as “Emperor and Augustus” Throughout the eighth and ninth centuries, Charlemagne, also known as Charles the Great, greatly expanded the Frankish kingdom into what came to be regarded as the Carolingian Empire. During his reign, Charlemagne successfully led many wars of conquest that had been started by his predecessors and in doing so, regained the wealth that had been lost during the Merovingian Dynasty. In addition, as a devout Christian, Charlemagne was aided by his alliance with the church. In what is known as the Carolingian Renaissance, he also implemented a variety of educational reforms in which he emphasized the seven liberal arts and the collection and correction of ancient texts. Charlemagne’s reign was so impactful …show more content…
While Einhard’s Life of Charlemagne focuses on the nature of Charlemagne’s military affairs and Notker’s Deeds of Charlemagne emphasizes the religious aspects of his life, both represent Charlemagne as a Christian ruler; this shows the important role that Christianity …show more content…
Charlemagne greatly cared about the activities of the church because he was a follower of Christianity himself, as shown by Einhard and Notker, and faith guided him throughout his entire reign as emperor. He was able to spread Christian faith in his kingdom by acting as a protector of the church and by trying to implement an unified practice of Christianity in all parts of his kingdom. This mutually beneficial relationship, in which Christian faith is upheld by the Pope and enforced by Charlemagne, was clearly established in Charlemagne’s coronation by Pope Leo III in 800 (Einhard, Life of Charlemagne 38 and Notker, Deeds of Charlemagne 76). In Notker’s version of the coronation, he states, “Then the holy man…asked the unconquered Charles to come to Rome, and since he was already ruler and emperor of many nations, to receive now the name of Emperor, Caesar, and Augustus by apostolic authority.” (Notker, Deeds of Charlemagne 76). The coronation was a recognition, by the papacy, of the power that Charlemagne already possessed. It was also a representation of the alliance between the church and the state, joined together by Christian

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