Terrestrial Carbon Cycle

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Carbon is one of the very important elements on planet earth. It contains four valence electrons, which can build essential properties of life, like DNA for example. It has organic properties for the basis of all living organisms. It is necessary for carbon to move through out the planet, through non-living and living things in order to have a balance of energy. Biogeochemical cycling moves carbon throughout the planet into living things and back again. Biogeochemical cycling is a pathway where an elemental compound and its energy move through non-living things to living things, and stored as well. For example, phytoplankton soaks up energy by using photosynthesis (non-living things to living). Carbon can move through a short period of time …show more content…
It has the biggest amount of carbon on the planet. Terrestrial ecosystems such as plants, animals, soil, and microorganisms are all the organic compounds that ingest, create, and store carbon. From the atmosphere, plants use photosynthesis to create energy, which also becomes an energy source for animals that eat the plants. When those animals die, their bodies decay into the soil, which is how carbon is stored into the soil for many years. Deep-water formation can mix the soil and the deep ocean to create carbon flow4. Both terrestrial and atmospheric carbon cycles can be connected into the oceanic carbon cycle. The oceanic carbon cycle is similar to the terrestrial carbon cycle. Aquatic plants and different types of plankton absorb energy through photosynthesis from the sun and the remaining recycled carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide also dissolves into the surface of the ocean and the decaying aquatic organism, which take a short amount of time to breakdown …show more content…
The limiting factors of HNLC are usually no temperatures, light, or cyanobacteria. The melting ice in Antarctica is a limiting factor because there are high levels of iron in dry temperatures. This means that dry areas, like deserts produce high levels of iron, which in turn can be blown into the ocean and produce primary production. Furthermore, melting ice equals Antarctic Iron. Where do Irons come from? Terrestrial environments, which are, in other words land from rivers. Which come from very dry climates like desserts. The reason why iron is so important is because it is necessary for photosynthesis. Iron is an electron transport in chloroplasts. While Iron is present in small amounts and few sources it is necessary in the ocean for photosynthesis. The enzymes in cyanobacteria help perform nitrogen fixation this information has become very controversial because of lack of efficiency it might entail. Questions such as when will we notice the removal of primary productivity or will we are able to stop once we start fertilizing the ocean with iron. Another fact of the matter is that is impossible to predict what the effects might bring. We do not know how it can affect organisms or other ecological systems, the ice and what

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