Motivational Predictors For CRC Surveillance

1191 Words 5 Pages
The following is a synopsis of articles looking into the issues to what we know and do not know about which are related to motivational predictors and perceived barriers associated with follow-up colorectal cancer (CRC) surveillance in newly diagnosed Lynch Syndrome (LS) aged 49 years and younger. Current theory-based claims that CRC surveillance produces benefits in that it is a preventative measure used in early cancer detection and early treatment, reducing CRC morbidity and mortality in high-risk LS individuals. There are many questions and a myriad of factors about CRC surveillance and motivational predictors in newly diagnosed LS aged 49 years and younger, that presents issues that are problematic in that there is a rise in this popualtion. …show more content…
Motivational predictors for CRC surveillance may vary among newly diagnosed LS aged 49 years and younger. One reason why for the CRC surveillance abstainers to act on their intentions may be lack of information or fear of the CRC surveillance procedure. As fear can be a high threat to health motivational behaviors, Boonyasiriwat et al. (2014) integrated two key concepts from two theoretical frameworks associated with behavior change, the parallel process model and the stage model of fear arousing, to examine psychosocial predictors for CRC screening. Results indicated that perceived colorectal cancer risk, past colonoscopy, fear of CRC, support from family and friends and health-care provider recommendation are determinants of colonoscopy intention. In addition, 28.3 % of participants ever had a colonoscopy in the past, 71.3 % never had a colonoscopy and 0.4% were unknown. Fear of getting colon cancer was 90%. In another study of screening compliance in LS individuals by Stoffel et al. (2010), 53 % of participants had appropriate CRC surveillance with colonoscopies, and those with inadequate CRC surveillance, 27% had colonoscopies less …show more content…
There are studies that report no association between CRC distress and general anxiety with CRC surveillance adherence or in ages 49 and younger. However one study, Landsbergen et al. (2012), found a small but significant association between cancer specific distress and following microsatellite instability (MSI) testing in newly diagnosed CRC and found high cancer-specific distress was observed in 40% of the MSI-positive patients, one year following CRC diagnosis. Related to perceived barriers is the issue of varied CRC surveillance (Schoenberg et al., 2016). The negative perceptions of CRC screening, lack of familiarity with or access to the medical system and inadequate or misinformed perspectives on screening undermines CRC surveillance. The most common cited barriers to CRC surveillance is anxiety (20%) cost (22%) no symptoms (34%), fear of pain (21%), fear of test (23%), and lack of physician recommendation (16%) (Lowery et al., 2012). In contrast, Hadley et al. (2011) assessed whether colonoscopy following mutation detection was associated with the levels of depressive symptoms. Results suggesting a significant, negative association between colonoscopy use and depressive symptoms 6 months post-mutation disclosure and in participants who did not complete a colonoscopy within the 6 months following

Related Documents