Breaking My Life: A Conceptual Analysis

2539 Words 11 Pages
Breaking my life down piece by piece, and analyzing it in another perspective makes me compare my life to the theories and concepts we have recently discussed. Everyone lives different experiences depending on a variety of factors. For me, mine seemed to be similar to the ones in the book, but yet, not identical. The older I got the more I learned about the so-called “puberty”. It was discussed in school, at home, and among peers. By middle school, many of my friends had already had their menarche, but it was age 12 before I had mine. Even though I did not proceed to have mine until a few years later, I still believe mine was about on time. In the book, chapter 14, it discusses how during the onset of puberty rapid physical growth occurs. …show more content…
During these years, you get the chance to really define and understand yourself, well, at least I did! These were the years where I got to figure out who I truly was and wanted to be. In chapter 16, Erickson discusses his fifth stage of development, identity versus role confusion. This is usually a stage that effects every teenager, and I personally experienced myself. Everyone has their own peers, hobbies, and background culture that helps build their identity. The role confusion comes in when someone is puzzled about their own, personal desires. When I was involved in this stage, I did not struggle as much as others when it came to discovering my identity. I have always been involved in sports which I believe played a large role in who I am because it taught me lessons, made me work harder, gave me a desire to accomplish goals, and push myself. With that being said, I could not have done all that by myself, and that is where my parent 's involvement in my identity occurs. Throughout, I have often picked up some of my parent’s morals and values which have contributed to me personally, but has also allowed me to experience role confusion over the years. The older I get, the stronger my opinions get, and the more of my parent’s values I exclude. With my opinions constantly changing, so are my morals and values. This means my identity has …show more content…
Arnett’s theory of emerging adulthood describes how this is the time for possibilities, exploration, instability, and self-focus. Experiencing these events, I could not agree more with Arnett’s theory. Entering college, I was filled with fear. I knew it could not even be compared to high school. I also knew I was entering an unfamiliar environment that eventually opened up a brand new door for new possibilities in my life. This was the time period I was exploring by myself for myself. I did not have my parents to completely lean on, or throw their opinions at me. Unlike the past, I was controlling myself at this point, and I was not stable in any way. I had always been indecisive, but when major, larger decisions appeared, it became a lot worse. This was the time that was supposed to be about me, but stress overcame that. Self-focus was hard to come by in most aspects in my life. It seemed like no matter how hard I tried to focus on myself, it was impossible due to a variety of obstacles. Additionally, these obstacles allowed me to learn who I was and what exactly I wanted. It was not long after, in this situation, I explored, became stable, and focused on myself enough to get things in a

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