Blood Sugar Regulation Essay

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Blood sugar regulation is the process by which the levels of blood sugar, primarily glucose, are maintained by the body within a narrow range. This phenomenon of tight regulation is commonly referred to as glucose homeostasis. Insulin and glucagon are the most well-known of the hormones involved. Blood sugar levels are regulated by negative feedback in order to keep the body in homeostasis. The levels of glucose in the blood are monitored by many tissues, but the cells in the pancreas's Islets of Langerhans are among the best understood and important.

The pancreas, in addition to its digestive functions, secretes two important hormones, insulin and glucagon, that are crucial for normal regulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism.
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Recall that somatostatin is also released by the hypothalamus (as GHIH), and the stomach and intestines also secrete it. An inhibiting hormone, pancreatic somatostatin inhibits the release of both glucagon and insulin.
The PP cell accounts for about one percent of islet cells and secretes the pancreatic polypeptide hormone. It is thought to play a role in appetite, as well as in the regulation of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine secretions. Pancreatic polypeptide released following a meal may reduce further food consumption; however, it is also released in response to fasting.
Glucagon
Receptors in the pancreas can sense the decline in blood glucose levels, such as during periods of fasting or during prolonged labor or exercise. In response, the alpha cells of the pancreas secrete the hormone glucagon, which has several effects:
It stimulates the liver to convert its stores of glycogen back into glucose. This response is known as glycogenolysis. The glucose is then released into the circulation for use by body cells.
It stimulates the liver to take up amino acids from the blood and convert them into glucose. This response is known as

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