The Black Studies Movement

Improved Essays
Black Studies in history have been undeniably a product of activism in education throughout the 1960 to the late 1980s. Those decades contributed to an important time in American history that has impacted the modern education of African-Americans today. During this period of time, there were studies showing various social movements that challenged the western society ideology and opened the doors for the movements to break down generations of inaccurate history that has supported the racist system today. It is a history that has negatively impacted the community and placed self-doubt within the culture of students.

My thesis studies four distinct African-American scholars who main focuses were on historical literature and history of the educated
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The Black Studies Movement was a momentous period that encouraged many to look at the education that was provide to them and rewrite history to become the revolution of Black Studies that it is today. The approach is that we must now focus on the importance of the pure African worldview, to go back and meet the needs of African people to acknowledge the mis-education that was given, to now develop the basic understanding of what is to be African American and to deconstruct the western society history. This approach was both articulated in Azibo,” The Fundamental Role of Culture and the African Centered Worldview,” and Meyer “, Optimal Theory and the Philosophical and Academic Origins of Black …show more content…
Nate Tuck is a prime example of a slave who believed in educating blacks to fight for the history of their land and promote self-spiritual education. There have been many more historical scholars who overtime as generations change to promote self-awareness. Scholar jobs were to give black people value and to teach them to accept their culture dispute years’ of succumbing western civilization history. Schomburg and Bethune believed the fight is not only inside of the African-American people but also within society itself…To bear arms against any culture that believe African-Americans cannot create their own history. To fight against the oppressor, we will view then to be less. To help African-Americans understand that there are not victims but have the capacity to change their lives and history. Meyer and Azibo take their teachings and help students not only think critically but to also analyze the racial dominance. Without fear, they are able to succeed and embrace the education of the black community. The African Studies was pivotal in empowering the black community; to embrace the change and change the way society has portrayed their

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