The Importance Of Being A Leader In The Army

714 Words 3 Pages
In June 2010, I was a newly promoted Private First Class in the United States Army. I’ve been in the active service for less than a year at that point and I was already outshining my peers. My First Sergeant, the most Senior Enlist Personnel in my Company, came up to me and gave a challenge. This Challenge would result in a complete change of direction in my career, my physical toughness, and my mental capacity to learn. It change my mind set on what it means to be a Soldier. It helped lay down the foundation of what being a Leader in the Army meant to me and how I should focus my Leadership style towards my peers and future Soldiers I will teach and lead. That challenge was, at the time, one of the most physically and mentally demanding leadership …show more content…
At the time the Army required all Soldiers to at least be certified in Combative Level 1. Level 2 is a volunteer course that covers up to 50 additional advance fighting techniques but Level 2 is not mandatory. Combative Level 3 and Combative Level 4 are instructor courses that not only require you to know to the techniques but to be able to administer platoon size elements of Soldiers (15 – 35 personnel) blocks of instructions and certify these Soldiers in Level 1&2. Combative Level 3 is a leadership courses that only Sergeants and above can attend. The reason being that it was designed as a trained the train course to Commissioned and Noncommissioned Officers can train and certify Soldiers in Combative Level 1 (Basic Combative Course). Since I was lower enlisted personnel, I had to attain a waiver to attend the course. My First Sergeant saw that I was motivated and believed that I could not only pass this rigorous course but I could use it to give back to the Army and train soldiers …show more content…
Immediately following we would do a PT (physical training) gauntlet of kickboxing, wrestling, and various exercises that are designed to condition the body for greater physical fitness and to push the Soldier mentally to show that pain is inevitable and only temporary, and that the human body can be pushed to great limits. After the PT gauntlet we would go into the instructions of the day. We would not only learn how the technique is properly completed, but also learn different teaching styles on how to teach the technique. The combination of learning how to memorize all these techniques, pushing myself day after day physically, and incorporating the techniques into every day Battle Drills that Maneuver Units (Infantry, Cavalry, and Armor Units) use made the course very demanding. In early July I graduated the course with a broken shins and a fractured foot from the abuse of kickboxing mishap during class one day. This course taught me a lot about what I can accomplish and knowing that I can achieve anything if I put my mind to it, work hard and drive on towards my

Related Documents